The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

The lucrative business of Obama-bashing

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Bernd Debusmann-- Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. --

Four days before Barack Obama was sworn into office, a prominent radio talk show host, Rush Limbaugh, told his conservative listeners that a major American publication had asked him to write 400 words on his hopes for the Obama presidency.

"I...don't need 400 words," he said, "I need four: I hope he fails."

The remark set the tone for a steady stream of unbridled and often bizarre criticism from Limbaugh and like-minded radio and TV commentators, several of them working for Fox News, the network owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch. Obama responded four days after his inauguration, telling a group of Republican congressmen they needed to break away from a mindset of confrontation.

"You can't just listen to Rush Limbaugh and get things done."

What followed should have helped the new administration to reflect on the wisdom of singling out a media critic. But it didn't. Limbaugh promptly portrayed himself as a man of such pivotal importance that the president of the world's only superpower needed to pay personal attention to his tartly-worded opinion.

from The Great Debate:

Obama, Elvis and America’s birthers

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Bernd Debusmann-- Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own. --
Nobody ever landed on the moon, the televised images are a hoax. John F. Kennedy was murdered in a complex plot involving the Mafia and the CIA. Elvis Presley lives. Barack Obama was born outside the United States and therefore is ineligible to be president.

All these claims stem from conspiracy theories and myths born in the U.S. and they throw a question mark over the long-held view of experts that such ideas flourish most in societies where news is controlled, access to information difficult and barriers to independent inquiry difficult to overcome.

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