The Great Debate UK

from Felix Salmon:

Lagarde leads from the front on Europe

By Felix Salmon
August 30, 2011

Going into the Jackson Hole conference, everybody was breathlessly awaiting Friday's speech from Ben Bernanke, which turned out to be incredibly boring. The most important speech of the meeting, by far, came on Saturday, and came from the new head of the IMF, Christine Lagarde. In decidedly undiplomatic prose she came right out and said what needed to be done:

from Felix Salmon:

How Philanthrocapitalism coddles CEOs

By Felix Salmon
June 24, 2011

A quick reply to Matthew Bishop and Michael Green, which with luck will bring this exchange to an end: I'm not saying that they make the case for the status quo. But when Davos Young Global Leaders, like Bishop, intone importantly about how "there is an urgent need to tackle fundamental flaws in the economic system" and how CEOs need to concentrate on long-term enlightened self-interest rather than "short-termist behavior", the very corporate chieftains they're trying to reach are going to nod in serious agreement and claim in all sincerity to be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.

from Felix Salmon:

How will the new IMF head be chosen?

By Felix Salmon
May 17, 2011

It takes Mohamed El-Erian until the very last paragraph of his FT op-ed to rule himself out of the running for managing director of the IMF: "I will not be part of this process," he says, adding that "I already have a great job, here in California."

from Felix Salmon:

Why Lagarde will be the next IMF managing director

By Felix Salmon
May 16, 2011

It now seems more likely that Dominique Strauss-Kahn will end up in a prison cell than that he will be elected president of France. Either way, his career at the IMF is over, which means that the race to succeed him is on.

from Felix Salmon:

Greenspan squanders his final reserve of credibility

By Felix Salmon
March 30, 2011

Thank you, internet: Henry Farrell and his commenters have all the snark so desperately required in response to Alan Greenspan's ludicrous op-ed in the FT. And they're not alone: as Alex Eichler notes, "everyone is laughing at Alan Greenspan today". Greenspan could hardly have made himself look like more of an idiot if he'd tried, not only because the "notably rare exceptions" construction is so inherently snarkworthy, but also because it's so boneheadedly stupid. Anything which normally makes money is a good idea if you ignore the times that it doesn't work.

from Felix Salmon:

How Larry Summers hobbled Obama’s economic policy

By Felix Salmon
January 19, 2011

I love myself a brutal takedown, and Jason Linkins's evisceration of Peter Baker's big NYT Magazine story on Obama's economic policy is a classic of the genre. Except, I have to admit to being Team Baker on this one. We've all read a lot of stories about the economy, and what bad shape it's in, and how we got to this sorry place. This one's different. It's written by the NYT's White House correspondent, and it raises an uncomfortable question: what if part of the problem is that Obama's economic team just wasn't a good team? What if, in fact, it turns out to have been a very bad team?

from Felix Salmon:

Varley’s flexible views on Basel

By Felix Salmon
October 19, 2010

In the UK, it seems, the revolving door from big private banks into a grandee's public-sector role doesn't turn quite as smoothly as it does in the U.S. And so sometimes it needs a not-so-gentle shove:

from Felix Salmon:

When secret meetings are boring and useless

By Felix Salmon
September 27, 2010

The WSJ has a great little story proving once and for all that just because something is secret doesn't mean it's interesting. Apparently, for a year or so, a "secret task force" met at ungodly hours on the sidelines of various euro-events in cities like Brussels and Luxembourg. Its members were hand-picked, its task momentous: to come up with a plan should a eurozone country enter a crisis and threaten the currency union.