The Great Debate UK

from Breakingviews:

Tim Cook’s pride may expand corporate talent pool

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Tim Cook’s pride may expand the corporate talent pool. The Apple chief executive’s decision to speak publicly about being gay should help advance the slow march toward acceptance. As boss of the world’s biggest company by market value, Cook could inspire others, giving C-suites and boardrooms more choice. They need it.

For an enterprise widely known for confidentiality, Cook’s sexual orientation wasn’t exactly a secret. Cook says many of his Apple colleagues were aware. For three years, Out magazine also put him atop its list of the most powerful gay people. And he has taken clear positions against discrimination of gay and transgender people.

His first public acknowledgement of being gay, in a Bloomberg Businessweek column published on Thursday, nevertheless represents a landmark. It’s extremely rare for the CEO of any sizable company to come out. One of the last notable examples was former BP boss John Browne, who did so under pressure in 2007 and later resigned. Cook’s timing and language set a decidedly different tone: “I’m proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me.”

The Great Sleep Debate

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Not that long ago everyone was lamenting the slovenliness of the British public. We didn’t work hard enough, took too many holidays and anxiety was rising about how we would ever keep up with our harder-working, more productive peers in China and the East. However, the tides is changing and, guess what, slovenliness is back.

Slovenliness is not quite accurate, but these days we can’t read a paper without being told that we need to get more sleep, be more mindful, take better care of ourselves and quit our technology addictions. Apparently, our need to tweet, check email and watch the latest Game of Thrones is literally killing us. Experts from Harvard, Cambridge and Surrey Universities have put together a report on humans and our need for sleep, and have come to the conclusion that we are arrogant to ignore our circadian rhythms.

from The Great Debate:

How technology widens the gender gap

The Internet and mobile phones have transformed our connections to people around the world. This technology has also, however, led to a widening gender gap in poorer countries. For it is largely men who control the information revolution that helps to educate, inform and empower.

In low and middle-income countries, a woman is 21 percent less likely than a man to own a mobile phone, according to research done by GSMA. In Africa, women are 23 percent less likely than a man to own a cell phone. In the Middle East the figure is 24 percent and in South Asia, 37 percent,

from The Great Debate:

Apple: ‘Early adopter’ as fashionista

To much fanfare, Apple announced Tuesday that Angela Ahrendts is resigning as chief executive officer of Burberry and joining the inner circle in Cupertino, California. “Apple-polishing” has become the headline du jour. Picturing the soignée Ahrendts surrounded by geeks in jeans and hoodies, we might be forgiven for wondering why Apple feels in need of a fashionista buff-up. After all, there is hardly a product line more shiny-bright than Apple’s -- or one with less affinity to the cold exclusivity of the world’s great fashion houses.

But the extraordinary affection that iPhones inspire is different from the anxious ostentation surrounding high fashion.

Science’s innovators are to be prized

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–Juha Ylä-Jääski (D.Tech.) is President and CEO of Technology Academy Finland. The opinions expressed are his own.–

The 2013 Nobel season is once again gorging on a Grand Cru vintage of scientific achievement. Today, the Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to three scientists, Levitt, Karplus and Warshel, whose multinational collaboration laid the foundation for the computer models crucial for most advances in chemistry today. Yesterday, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert won the Nobel Prize for physics for conceiving the so-called “God particle” which explains why the Universe has mass. Another trio were recognised on Monday when the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was awarded to Rothman, Schekman and Südhof for solving the mystery of how the cell transports crucial cargo.

The digital divide and inspiring young people into science

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By Dr Juha Ylä-Jääski, President and CEO, Technology Academy Finland

– The opinions expressed are the author’s own –

Don’t let them be the lost generation.

The young have borne the brunt of the current economic malaise afflicting Europe and much of the developed world, with chronic levels of unemployment and gloomy prospects. At the same time, many are equipped or have the potential to be equipped with the digital skills that can transform our economies through innovation, qualities that their elders often struggle with.

We are failing to grasp this opportunity, however, with demand for tech skills outpacing the ability of educators to provide for it, opening a digital divide that is holding back our economies and our young people.

UK startups need to get big enough to fail

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–Amanda Jobbins is Group Chief Marketing Officer of The Sage Group. The opinions expressed are her own.–

Start-ups are hot on the business news agenda. Their importance to the UK, and the economic recovery, has been emphasised by the vocal support David Cameron’s government has repeatedly voiced for start-up initiatives. The decision to employ Facebook’s former Vice President Joanna Shields as CEO of Tech City is a clear demonstration of the government’s investment, while the Conservative Party launched its own ‘Start Up Hub’ competition in Manchester earlier this year, which provides entrepreneurs with an opportunity to showcase their ideas.

US-China research ties should be a wake-up call to Europe

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–Dirk Jan van den Berg is President of Delft University of Technology, and was formerly the Dutch Ambassador to China and the Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York. The opinions expressed are his own.–

Despite much media attention on disagreements, ranging from Taiwan to alleged cyber-attacks, as Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Barack Obama prepare for their first major summit meeting in California, there is a relatively new and growing basis for warmer ties: scientific and technological collaboration. 

The regulatory maze of a pan-European cloud

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–Ian Winham is Chief Information Officer of Ricoh Europe. The opinions expressed are his own.–

Cloud computing is widely regarded by policymakers and business leaders to be one of the biggest keys for unlocking business growth in Europe today. So much so that the European Commission is currently formulating a cloud strategy to promote cloud use across the private and public sectors across all of Europe.

Why we are not witnessing a tech boom

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By Kathleen Brooks. The opinions expressed are her own.

The words ‘tech bubble’ have been bandied about since the Apple share price really started to climb at the end of 2011. Earlier this month, its market capitalisation hit $600 billion dollars, only the second company to see its market cap get that high. So it appears like everyone wants a bite out of the proverbial apple.

There is a dangerous precedent for markets’ believing that tech stocks can only go in one direction. The dotcom bubble back in 2000 caused havoc in the equity markets and also contributed to the Federal Reserve keeping interest rates incredibly low, one of the contributing factors to the housing crisis in 2007.

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