The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Don’t bet on Asians imitating Americans

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Asia's calamity is that Americans are imitating frugal Asians a lot faster than Asians can become free-spending Americans.

The old economic model -- that Asia exports to the U.S., saves its earnings and lends the money back to Americans to buy more stuff -- is broken and no one can say what will arise in its place.

Americans are not willingly becoming savers, cultural change is being forced on them by the credit crunch and their own busted balance sheets.

The hope for Asia, which has seen an absolutely stunning cliff dive in its economies, is that domestic demand can grow to replace U.S. consumption. This faces huge hurdles; a social safety net that is threadbare to non-existent and a population that just doesn't understand the risks of living closer to your means but sees frugality and the storing up of wealth as a virtue.

Confronting medical issues for women

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shelley-2008

- Shelley Ross is secretary general of the Medical Women’s International Association, a non-governmental organisation representing women doctors from all continents. The opinions expressed are her own. -

The Medical Women’s International Association was created in 1919, not long after the first International Women’s Day in 1911. MWIA’s founder was an American by the name of Dr. Esther Pohl Lovejoy, who served as its first president. She was an obstetrician by training but an activist and humanitarian by action. Not only did she establish MWIA but she also founded the American Women’s Hospital Service during the First World War.

from The Great Debate:

Advancing global Internet freedom

Leslie Harris -- Leslie Harris is the president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology in Washington, DC. The views expressed are her own. --

In the wake of troubling reports as recently as last year that Western companies were assisting China with Internet censorship and the unmasking of cyber-dissidents, governments around the world seemed poised to regulate the conduct of Internet companies. Lawmakers appear to have stepped back from those efforts, but the challenges of advancing global Internet freedom remain.

from The Great Debate:

U.S. cap-and-trade choice inferior to carbon tax

John Kemp Great Debate-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

President Barack Obama's first budget puts climate change at the heart of the administration's long-term economic plan. But despite the clear theoretical advantages of a simple carbon tax, he seems set to follow the EU and California in opting for a cap-and-trade system.

The budget plan commits the administration to work with Congress on an economy-wide emissions reductions program, based around cap-and-trade.

from The Great Debate:

The Black Hole: How the Web devours history

ericauchard1-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Academics, family researchers and even baseball history nuts have noticed recently how some important archives of older newspapers from around the world have vanished off the Web.

The problems have surfaced since PaperofRecord.com, a collection of more than 20 million newspaper pages of papers ranging from the Toronto Star to Mexican village periodicals to newspapers as far as Perth, Australia, merged into Google News Archive.

from The Great Debate:

In Cuba, low-hanging fruit for Obama

Bernd Debusmann - Great Debate-- Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. --

A look at a list of the foreign policy problems facing U.S. President Barack Obama could send the sunniest optimist into depression.

from The Great Debate:

A revenue and legalization lesson from FDR

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. --

(Correcting name of academic to Peter Reuter on Feb 27)

Want to help fund the bank bailout, ease California's budget crisis and shore up strained U.S. finances? Legalize drugs, tax the trade and save on interdiction, domestic enforcement and the prison and court system.

I'm only partly joking.

It won't solve all of the U.S.'s problems and lord knows will cause some new ones, but the money is undeniably big enough to make a dent.

from The Great Debate:

Too many hopes pinned on EU bank

paul-taylor-- Paul Taylor is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

It works more like a sprinkler than a power hose, but the European Investment Bank has a role to play in preventing a financial inferno from sweeping across central and eastern Europe.

The trouble is that politicians have overloaded the European Union's long-term lending arm with exaggerated expectations, calling on it like a fire brigade in every emergency, from saving credit-starved small firms to greening the car industry, combating the energy crisis and fighting climate change.

from The Great Debate:

Ad strategy at root of Facebook privacy row

ericauchard1-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Social networking phenomenon Facebook has beaten out arch-rival and former market leader MySpace by most measures of popularity, except the one that pays the bills.

While Facebook has outpaced MySpace in bringing in members -- it has 175 million active users at the latest count, compared with around 130 million for MySpace -- it has struggled make money from them. While MySpace is closing in on $1 billion in revenues, Facebook generated less than $300 million in sales last year, reports say.

from The Great Debate:

Commodities send coded clues on inflation

John Kemp Great Debate-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

After an 8-year period of remarkable stability, the ratio between gold and oil prices has broken down spectacularly.

The relative rise in gold is consistent with other indications that the market is bracing for a delayed upturn in inflation between 2010 and 2012.

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