The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

First 100 Days: Prioritize and take a hands-on approach

ram-charan-photo-- Ram Charan is the author several book, including "Leadership in the Era of Economic Uncertainty: The New Rules for Getting the Right Things Done in Difficult Times." A noted expert on business strategy, Charan has coached CEOs and helped companies like GE, Bank of America, Verizon, KLM, and Thomson shape and implement their strategic direction. The opinions expressed are his own. --

The first 100 days demand that President Barack Obama sort out his priorities and choose the ones that will help solve many others. With many constituencies and direct reports clamoring for his time and attention, he cannot attend to them all.  He has to decide which of the many complex and urgent issues that have accumulated must be resolved first.

The new president will inevitably be pushed to spend a huge amount of time on foreign policy.  But I suggest that the president’s top priority should be to get the nation out of this economic and psychological funk.  He has selected some very capable people who will help sort out the economic mess. He made a brilliant move to have Paul Volcker in the White House.

But ensuring that various parts of the U.S. economy work together and with the rest of the global economy will take a significant amount of President Obama’s personal time and leadership. I have seen in my work with corporations that the best leaders are hands-on when it comes to making sure their top people coordinate their efforts.  The new president will have to do the same with the secretary of Treasury, Federal Reserve chair, SEC chair, and other relevant government leaders. Each of these experts sees the situation through the lens of his or her expertise.

from The Great Debate:

U.S. and UK on brink of debt disaster

John Kemp Great Debate-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. --

The United States and the United Kingdom stand on the brink of the largest debt crisis in history.

While both governments experiment with quantitative easing, bad banks to absorb non-performing loans, and state guarantees to restart bank lending, the only real way out is some combination of widespread corporate default, debt write-downs and inflation to reduce the burden of debt to more manageable levels. Everything else is window-dressing.

from The Great Debate:

Obama must redefine success in Afghanistan

Paul Taylor Great Debate-- Paul Taylor is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Barack Obama says he will make Afghanistan the central front in his fight against terrorism but the incoming U.S. president will have to scale back the war aims he inherits from George W. Bush and redefine success.

Bush ordered the U.S.-led invasion in 2001 to oust a Taliban government that was harboring al Qaeda militants blamed for the 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington.

from UK News:

Banks rescue package: will they start lending again?

Melanie Bien, director, Savills Private Finance, is a guest commentator. The opinions expressed in this commentary are her own.

It is too early to say whether the latest bank rescue plan will have the desired effect of persuading the banks to start lending again. But it is a step in the right direction and we welcome it as a positive move as it may just remove the remaining stumbling blocks to getting the credit and mortgage markets functioning properly once more.
Clearly, something further had to be done. October’s £37bn bank recapitalisation did little to persuade banks to regain their appetite for lending. Credit continues to be difficult to come by – unless you have a large deposit or equity in your home and a clean credit history.

from The Great Debate:

Are a CEO’s health problems a private matter?

dr-jgsm-05-- Dana Radcliffe is a Day Family senior lecturer of business ethics at the Johnson School at Cornell University. The views expressed are his own. --

Are a CEO’s health problems a private matter? Or does he or she have an obligation to disclose them to investors and other stakeholders?

from The Great Debate:

Betting on the unthinkable in the euro zone

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Some crises bring partners closer together. Some, as investors in the euro zone are likely to discover this year, drive them further apart.

Look for rising tensions about fiscal and monetary policy among the bloc's 16 member nations, and for a bigger penalty to be imposed on the euro and some euro zone assets against the possibility of a breakup or a secession from the currency group.

from The Great Debate:

What Apple loses without Steve

steve_jobs


-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

"There's probably no God" runs the slogan of an advertising campaign humanists are running on buses across Britain. But if the supreme being has his doubters, few question the importance of Steve Jobs to Apple Inc.

In a letter to employees on Wednesday, the Apple co-founder said he would take himself "out of the limelight" for six months after learning in the past week that his still vaguely defined "health issues" are "more complex than I originally thought."

from The Great Debate:

In Gaza war, lions led by donkeys?

Bernd Debusmann - Great Debate- Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own -

It's not often that a senior member of Washington's usually staid and cautious foreign policy establishment likens Israeli political leaders to donkeys and questions their competence. But the fighting in Gaza prompted Anthony Cordesman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies to do just that.

"Will Israel end in empowering an enemy in political terms that it defeated in tactical terms? Will Israel's action seriously damage the U.S. position in the region, and hope of peace, as well as moderate Arab regimes and voices in the process? To be blunt, the answer so far seems to be yes.

from UK News:

Easing the pain for small businesses

The government has unveiled a plan to guarantee up to 20 billion pounds of loans to help small businesses survive the credit crunch.

But there are concerns that will not be enough to get the banks lending sufficient funds to help businesses get access to cash.

from The Great Debate:

Revival of U.S. automaking awaits if UAW will follow Toyota

morici-- Peter Morici is a professor at the University of Maryland School of Business and former chief economist at the U.S. International Trade Commission. The views expressed are his own. --

General Motors and Chrysler are on the anvil of history. United Auto Workers President Ron Gettelfinger holds the hammer and will determine whether they emerge more competitive or shattered in pieces and sold to foreign investors.

  •