The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

A stimulating energy policy

January 28, 2009

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- Robert Engle is the Michael Armellino Professor of Finance at New York University Stern School of Business and a Nobel Laureate. His views are his own. -

from The Great Debate:

Global crisis politics – A Davos debate with Nouriel Roubini and Ian Bremmer

By Andrew MacGregor Marshall
January 28, 2009

As governments grapple with the global crisis, politics has taken on central importance in determining the course of the world economy -- and political risk is more significant than ever.

from The Great Debate:

Is the executive pay bubble popping?

By J Saft
January 28, 2009

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Signs are it won't just be the salaries of bankers coming under fire.

An unusual array of forces are combining to make it very likely that top tier pay may be structurally falling, rather than simply taking a cyclical dip during a downturn.

from The Great Debate:

Turning the tables: Can you help Davos leaders?

By Reuters Staff
January 27, 2009

Klaus SchwabDavos is a well-rehearsed event and everyone knows the part they should play. Business and political leaders gather each year to tackle the major challenges of a global economy while the rest of the world, or those of its citizens who are interested, look on from afar. But this year, for obvious reasons, things are different. The notion of leadership has been coupled in the public mind with that of responsibility. The tone here is a little more humble and the attitude more open-minded. There's a recognition that new thinking is required.  A suitable time, perhaps, to turn the tables on convention and have Davos delegates ask the questions they can't answer and for global citizens to offer solutions.

from The Great Debate:

Outsourcing faces new era of scrutiny

January 27, 2009

ericauchard1-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Outsourcing, Indian-style, is challenged as never before by an erosion in business confidence that makes corporate spending, even to generate quick cost-savings, harder to justify.

from The Great Debate:

Davos debate: How to fix finance?

By Reuters Staff
January 26, 2009

The credit crunch has left little of the globe unaffected and few sectors of the world economy untouched. The interlinkages between economics and finance are at the core of discussions at the World Economic Forum in Davos. Reuters News asked delegates for their analysis of the roots of the problem and prescriptions for recovery.

from The Great Debate:

Davos debate: What can be done for the global economy?

By Reuters Staff
January 26, 2009

wefpic2With business and consumer confidence fading, the prospects for the global economy appear the worst for a generation. Amid the gathering gloom, are things really that bad? And can nothing be done to give the global growth engine a kick-start?

from The Great Debate:

Credit control will be much more intrusive in future

January 26, 2009

John Kemp Great Debate-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

The international system of bank regulation, epitomised by the Basle II process and the light-touch principles-based regulation of Britain's Financial Services Authority (FSA) has comprehensively failed.

from The Great Debate:

A new direction in global financial regulation

January 26, 2009

John Kemp Great Debate-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist.  The views expressed are his own --

UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown's call today for a new G20 charter of principles on financial regulation  reflects an emerging consensus among policymakers that, once the immediate crisis has passed, the regulatory framework must be fundamentally redesigned.

from UK News:

BBC – taking a stand on Gaza

January 26, 2009

The BBC has been roundly condemned at home for its refusal to broadcast an emergency appeal for Gaza on behalf of the Disasters Emergency Committee, a coalition of 13 aid agencies.