Comments on: Managing nonprofits in an “age of hope” http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Pat http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-6000 Sun, 25 Jan 2009 15:56:35 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-6000 After Wall Street bail out, and failed regulatory efforts, it’s clear that charities, non profits, nor institutions can or should be tax exempt since together they have the capacity to save and hoard, steal, and waste American assets, income, and jobs, then leave America with the bill – as has happened already.

The price for that inefficiency and neglect must be taxes for those not subject to them previously.

America has no choice, or there will be no America.

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By: birgit http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4453 Fri, 02 Jan 2009 13:30:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4453 I love satire…obahhh-maaaah will fix as much as W after clintoon…
You still don’t get it! There is no difference:
The 2 wings of the demopublican party been having fun at our exspense for decades!

Obama who appointed all Clintoon cronies and voted for the bail out and his handler goes back to Carter days-
the polish immigrant whose ‘children’ worked for both McCain and Obama during the campaign.
Read more, believe less of the offical distraction propaganda, do your own research.
Stop ingesting fluoride!

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By: TS http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4299 Wed, 31 Dec 2008 04:03:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4299 The dominant equation seems to be – better pay = better performance. But if this was true, then the sad situation we are in today should not have been. Unfettered worship of mammon will only culminate in the sort of quagmire Wall Street and US finds itself in. If the reward on the other side is too great (read multi million dollar stock options), execs will find all ways, good and not so good to achieve it, the stakes are simply too high and try any means to achieve it attitude prevails, and when this attitude gets engendered on a mass scale, there is a destabilising effect on the society.

Run the company for a few years, cash in on your options and get out, leaving the company in a mess, who cares, the government will bail out anyway, if we are too big.

So probably we need to think of other ways to reward executives rather than money and a disproportionate amount at that. One way, lock their options and let them cash in 5 years after they have quit. This will ensure they make decisions for long term good.

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By: Anubis http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4285 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 23:56:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4285 Non Profit has become synonymous with charity or foreign aid. This is an unfortunate misconception. At one time broadcast companies were required by law to provide 30 minutes of commercial free news every morning and evening as a public service. News rooms were run as a Non Profit entity. Public health systems here and around the world including nationalized health care are not for profit. Universities are public and private are run the same way.

Perhaps it is time that as a society we weigh in on what services we wish to remain for profit or not for profit. And while we are at it, however we choose, we should demand better from both. I for one am not satisfied with the state of health care or education at any level in this society just to name two. The basket is full of things that need to be fixed.

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By: Craig http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4283 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 23:30:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4283 Gosh, Jeanne… You seem awfully angry at our new president when he hasn’t even had a day of work yet. Through your barely coherent rambling, I read that you’re mad about all the things the current free-spending administration has done for the past eight years, but somehow you blame it on “the liberals.” The current, outgoing administration has destroyed the economy.

There are many, many, many charities that do not get government funding, that do great work. Instead of complaining about how you’re sick of begging charities sponging off the government and giving all the money away, you should research a little bit and give to the ones deserving of your support. The ones the article is putting the spotlight on.

There are excellent charities out there. But in these economic times, we’ll see many of the less fit disappear, leaving those they serve without help.

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By: Jeanne http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4270 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 17:18:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4270 Isn’t it typical for a bleeding heart liberal to write an article espousing that American give more money away to the poor and other countries..American does more aide around the world that all of the others added together…we are more charitable and caring..I for one am SICK of this liberal agenda of taking our money and dispensing it as the government deems appropriate..I have finally STOPPED donating to charities for this reason..My Taxes are charitable enough..I think more people will start hoarding their money and stop giving if his global inniative is implemented..I will be glad when he is voted out of office in 2012..and congress removed in 2010..they will spend the next two years sticking it to us and people will say enough is enough!!..remember my words

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By: Derek James From http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4258 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 13:12:28 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4258 I completely agree with this article and many of the comments. Too long, in my experience, has the non-profit/charitable sector been immune from serious scrutiny. It needs to be recognized that it has become an industry sector like any other industry sector. The emerging non-profit/charitable business sector needs to come under the same regulation and governance that other for-profits are subject too. In fact, a higher standard needs to be developed since the non-profit/charitable sector can rely on moral sentiments and good will to raise funds, and this in turn should produce a fiduciary duty of the highest variety owed to both the people who give and to those whom the money is intended.

The high wages within non-profits/charitable organizations and the low levels of accountability to both the donor and the recipient of aid have fostered an environment of bizarre financial opportunity for precisely the type of person who is not motivated by the urgency of a social cause or harm, precisely the type of person who should not be working in the non-profit/charitable sector.

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By: John G. Fike, CFRE http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4257 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 10:55:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4257 One of the key reasons America’s nonprofit organizations have not been able to build the capacity they need to accomplish their missions effectively is that the giving public has been inundated by the media and the so-called “charity watchdogs” with a phobia against having any of their dollars used for building that capacity within our nonprofits.

Training, fundraising infrastructure, adequate salary structures are seen by most boards and executives as “luxuries” they are loathe to invest in because they don’t want to offend their donors. Donors often make the mistake of using business ratios when determining where to lodge their gifts. But the ratio of salaries to program or fundraising to program are irrelevant in the nonprofit sector because a nonprofit’s salaries ARE their program, and their fundraising acumen needs improvement so that they can be successful and effective in accomplishing their mission. If they’re not able to raise funds, they are not able to deliver needed services.

What we truly need is for the American giving public to be aware that their stereotypes about giving must change so that nonprofits can build the capacity they need to do their jobs effectively. Boards need to change in becoming willing to invest in capacity-builing and fundraising infrastructure. We cannot let the very few mishaps with charities put us off the mark. Capacity-building in our nonprofits is a critical need.

Respectfully, John G. Fike, CFRE, Fundraising Consultant and President, Association of Fundraising Professionals, Detroit Chapter, and Adjunct Faculty Instructor in Nonprofit Management, Eastern Michigan University.

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By: Youri Carma http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4253 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 08:04:17 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4253 Obama only gots our backs when:

1 – He stops expensive wars.

2 – He stops expensive bailouts.

3- He orders Financial Disarmament which means dismantling the shadow banking system and freezing the instruments of speculative trade.

All the off sheet balance products will be eliminated which means dismantling the hedge funds, derivatives, naked short selling etc…

This also means democratizing monetary policy by taking their control over the monetary policy which forcefully challenges the hegemony of the Wall Street financial institutions.

(The term “financial disarmament” was initially coined by John Maynard
Keynes in the 1940s.)

4- Reverse the very very bad rules from the past:

Reverse ->1999 Repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act that separated commercial from investment banking by the Clinton Administration.

Reverse ->2000 Derivatives and credit default swaps were excluded from regulation.

Reverse ->2004 The greatest mistake setting aside capital requirements by exempting the investment banks from maintaining reserves to cover losses on investments engineered and This allowed the investment banks to: Leverage financial instruments beyond
any bounds of prudence. (Bear Stearns pushed its leverage ratio to 33 to 1 advised by crappy computer models – even 100 to 1 is heard!.)

5- A; This only can be done if the current failing financial Hanky panky hokes are removed from their offices. The real problem continuous if these criminal greedy dokes stay where they are right now especially when the whole “Fancy Fair” is Nationalized.

B; Make the Illegal FED really Federal. The Federal Reserve is not really Federal but a couple of private banks owned by a hand full of families now! During this process Skip J.P.Morgan out of the equation.Saves the American taxpayer 3%.

FED->2%->J.P Morgan->4,5%->Treasury->1,5%.

C- Start publishing real figures again which are “for real” this time.

6-Separate the bad mortgages from the good ones.
– Revalue the mortgage-backed securities accordingly.
– Completely sort out counter party risk for credit default swaps and interest rate swaps.

Mark my words, mark my words if this is not done, the country will go down!

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By: summer http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/29/managing-nonprofits-in-an-age-of-hope/#comment-4247 Tue, 30 Dec 2008 05:47:56 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=1055#comment-4247 One reason why companies end up in fraud is they are expected to report quarterly. This short horizon discourages management from taking a long term look at the path a company needs to take to be successful. It won’t be possible to behave ethically until quarterly reports stop being the measure for success, thus goading management into fraud in an attempt to keep their jobs.

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