Comments on: Healthcare reforms warnings from France and Canada http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Jon http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-21123 Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:57:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-21123 Without going into specifics, I will say only one thing. The Canadian health care system is imperfect but improving. Would I trade the Canadian system for the American system, or what is being proposed? No bloody way.

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By: Pink Muslimah http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-20739 Wed, 12 Aug 2009 15:15:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-20739 Did you know that the US is the only industrialised country in the world that still lacks a wholly public health care system?

What does private health care cost? Studies show that Americans pay more money for less health care than other countries. American corporations cannot compete with other corporations from around the world because they are burdened with the financial and bureaucratic difficulties associated with insuring their employees’ health. And while bankruptcies can result from any number of financial difficulties, half of the bankruptcies filed in the US are a direct result of medical costs. This is not solely the problem of the uninsured: the vast majority of those health care-related bankruptcies come from those who are insured.

But the cost is much more than dollars and cents. It is about human lives. Our infant mortality rate is higher than that of Taiwan and Cuba, in addition to most European countries including Croatia. Entire cities’ worth of American babies die each year in the US compared to Canada because our infant mortality rate is that much higher than theirs. 18,000 people die in the US every year because they could not access health care. This number includes the insured and uninsured. 47 million people in the United States do not have health insurance.

How much longer will we force ourselves and our fellow Americans to suffer from our pride and our unwillingness to stand up to the message streaming from the lobbyists of our corporate HMOs? How much longer will we watch our corporations struggle and fall while those in other countries struggle and survive? When will we regain our sense of pride and take back this system which has been controlled by impersonal, uncaring corporations for far too long?

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By: Fat Lazy Low-income Slob http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-20663 Mon, 10 Aug 2009 19:40:20 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-20663 OK! I get it, all of the US’s problems are the fault of worthless-workless people like me? OMG thank you for that insight. When a bag of potato chips and a soda cost less than a bag of crisp veggies and a bottle of water, then you can criticize me for my choices. I am more than sick to death of your types. I am ‘diseased’ of them. I put in my time as a drone..did an honest job in construction fed my children healthier and all of that, now I have been unable to even get an interview for a new job, so we rely on California’s medi-cal to keep my daughter from being an ADD nightmare and to keep my wife from dropping into a coma from hypothyroidism. Get off these forums if you can’t acknowledge what simultaniously advances and bankrupts the US is GREED. And a healthy dose of hate for those who have fallen on hardships. And I will proudly use my EBT card to feed my family and hope this subsidized healthcare for all comes into play, so when I am forced to take a minimum wage job after my unimployment ensurance runs out…I can affordthe same medicines that some in my family need to survive, sure it will cost more taxes. But I’ll be lgad to pay em whenever someone decides that I am worthy to be their employee. Hate sucks and so do you.

And I wasn’t even going to comment until I kept reading that somehow the problems were all my income groups fault, instead of blame sitting on elitist well-to-do who think they can stand on our backs to remain ridiculously weathly.

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By: Drew http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-20574 Fri, 07 Aug 2009 15:52:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-20574 Again the Canadian perspective, we have a government scandal here involving tax payer money and abuse of health care funds. E-health is a disgrace in this province (google: E-health scandal Ontario).

Scumbag insurance companies are one thing…but giving your hard earned money to the government is not a lesser evil. Your taxes, your political freedom might be at risk, in my opinion. Canada has the highest taxes in the world, also one of the lowest birthrates. Taxes kill jobs. Canada has a generation of its best and brightest living in their parents basement…

Your Cash for Clunkers is a great example. The government now owns the U.S. automakers. And if the government sees competition it eliminates it. Look what they are doing to the competition: old cars. Destroying old cars forever is a ass-backwards way for your government to be touting the environment while pulling this crap.

But this is the thing…State-run healthcare will have consequences, good or bad depending on if you like the nanny state…Good luck. You’ll need it.

Your Canadian Neighbour,
Drew
Bracebridge, Ontario

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By: Michael Williams, MD http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-20218 Wed, 05 Aug 2009 16:25:31 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-20218 You collectively described the financial pressures that Canada and France are facing. They pale in comparison to what the US government is facing. Health care outcomes are across the board better in both countries than in the US. They are by and large getting what they pay for. Infants don’t die as often, people, on average live longer. Without hard data to support this, much like the authors, I would say from my experience practicing medicine for 10+ years in Washington, DC, a far greater percentage of Americans “die waiting for care” than in either country combined. Very few Canadian or French politicians or news outlets are calling for a fully-privatized system of insurance that ensures that care is unequally available. This despite the fact that both countries provide care for all citizen and non-citizen alike.

One last point: please stop implying that waiting a year for a physical exam by a family physician is somehow bad. If you’re between the ages of 16 and about 40 and have no significant family history to speak of (i.e. most people in most countries, although that’s shifting) you don’t need an annual physical. Its in no one’s interest to delay finding a serious illness, more advanced disease is much more expensive to care for than early stage disease. No well-designed, implemented and managed system created in this era would deliberately push people into greater degrees of illness, the system and the payors (that’s us) couldn’t afford to. Stop peddling fear, start thinking of ways to get the best of private and government plans. The US military does it exceedingly well, driving innovation and keeping private industry fat. Surely the health of our fellow citizen is worth the effort, yes?

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By: william scott http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-19957 Mon, 03 Aug 2009 18:38:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-19957 Wake up people! You only get what you pay for. It is time to make the hard choices as to what you really need and how you are going to pay for it. Don’t expect a government mandate that everyone gets free health insurance to be a reality. At some point the money runs out and you have to decide who gets what treatment and who doesn’t get treated. I’m talking about cost / benefit ratios. Are you going to spend 1/2 of a person’s total health care costs in the last year of life like we presently do, or allocate that money to patients that have many years of life?

The medical malpractice situation must change because 15 to 20% of your dollars are going to lawyers and the few people who file these lawsuits. 75% of malpractice suits are frivolous and need to be squashed before they ever reach a court. The other 25 % need to be adjudicated by a medical review board, not a court of law. A board composed of elected members representing the people, and the medical profession would hear cases and decide guilt or not. The monetary awards would be appropriate to the injury. No lawyer’s contingency fees, no excessive pain and suffering fees.
It is time to decide what you want, or the forces of special interests and financial necessity will decide for you!

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By: General_Mortars http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-19944 Sun, 02 Aug 2009 23:47:42 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-19944 If America goes with single payer system, then I would be glad to have the same medical benefits as our President and Government Senators and Congressmen.

Am I asking too much? If they are covered by Government Medical Insurance why CAN’T the regular Joe Six-Pack have the same benefits?

I pay $1200 year on Point of Service health care I pay a premium and co-pay with $500 deductible. I am fairly happy with my Insurance. However, once I get on Social Security and medicare, I will have to drop my Company Insurance and wait in long lines with inferior care-not able to CHHOOSE my own Doctor.

I will then have to buy supplemental insurance to cover what Medicare refuses to insure.

God help us all!

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By: Henry HOLLENBERG http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-19934 Sun, 02 Aug 2009 12:45:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-19934 Unfortunately we are focusing on the wrong thing. The issue is not that we can’t afford health care. The problem is we can’t afford anything. Our entire economy is falling apart. Health care is just one more nice thing we can’t afford (public or private) in a failing economy. Fix the economy and all the sudden health care becomes affordable. The public option is always the least efficient of course.

GDP has been sliding in relation to total money supply (M3), ie Velocity of money (VOM), for 100 years. Use of credit rather than cash as the primary source of our money supply has been rising for 100 years and now stands at 97% credit and 3% cash. In 1865 we were 50/50. Wonder if that could have something to do with the stagnant GDP? Sure could use another Abraham Lincoln / Henry Charles Carey combo with their clear thinking on Macro-Economics. They faced a seemingly insurmountable problem in their day, paying for the civil war. They managed to pay for the war and stimulate the economy, tripling the VOM/economy. Wonder how they did that? These problems aren’t new and have all been solved in the past, just have to study a bit of history.

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By: Christian http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-19932 Sun, 02 Aug 2009 10:11:02 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-19932 Answer from a French. (Christian is my firstname)
Since World War II, French system was designed to give as best as possible heath care to the population. Since Free Market arrived in France, around 1970, the goal as been to ivert ressources to feed private companies, since we send our jobs in China and real jobs disappeared, real income decrease…
Our ‘public’ (in fact managed by syndicates and companies) has a 2% cost compared with private companies who first take money (15-20%) for investors then use the rest to pay their clients.
French government took control of the system some time ago, and since that time reduces the benefits since increasing cost for people. From that time, costs exploded. Because private companies are not effectve in term of money used to care people, since if you don’t meet your doctor when you begin to be sick, you’ll need very expensive hospital cares…
All this since the french government try to implement US style system in France.
We dream to go back to the one payer system…
Since things should have been changed, it seem we always head to the wrong direction: less care, more costs.
Don’t forget that French productivity has been proven the best of the world by English and US studies.
WHY? Good education, good health, good infrastructures. But this mean that government need money.
And we have a 50% taxes in France (in average when you take Income taxes, VAT,social systems…), and I’m happy of this.
Think about it and choose.

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By: Richard Barr http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/07/20/healthcare-reforms-warnings-from-france-and-canada/#comment-19904 Sat, 01 Aug 2009 16:34:59 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4534#comment-19904 I can tell you first hand, waiting lists for health care suck. People that are diagnosed with serious illness sometimes find themselfs gridlocked in Canadian health care. HOWEVER, almost all of said people would never have afforded the medical attention leading up to said diagnoses due to extreme costs of medical attention in the United States. Personally, I will take having to wait (and risk it) over never knowing what is wrong with me and have a 100% chance of death or permananent disabiity due to my low income. I’ll choose living, thanks. Canadian health care: not perfect, but functional. American Health Care: dysfunctional and a slap in the ace.

The Ontario woman that is seen slamming Canadian health care in US anti-health reform ads forgot that little nugget of truth, her money would have run out long before she saw that specialist in the US.

Why have Canadian health care costs balooned? Simply due to the fact that North Americans live unhealthy life styles, live with too many enviromental carcinogens, exercise too little, and only seek medical attention when something is wrong. Private or public health care will not change that fact. What ‘Canadian’ style health care can provide is care to all citizens, regardless of wealth.

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