Comments on: Japan: The mother of all miserable recoveries http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/08/18/japan-the-mother-of-all-miserable-recoveries/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: andy stanforth http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/08/18/japan-the-mother-of-all-miserable-recoveries/#comment-21206 Wed, 19 Aug 2009 07:21:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4922#comment-21206 Yet another “expert” talking down the recovery. Perhaps constant gloomy predictions sell news feed but sadly commentators are rarely held to account later on. I’m sure the same things could have been said of the 1990 recession which had similar aspects. Many of us can remember Mrs Thatcher speaking of Nigel Lawson’s “economic miracle” which later turned out to be a credit bubble similar to this one. The recession did not lead to economic collapse although there were some tricky times for Norman Lamont around the corner.

The fact that the whole world is working together to turn things round; the better understanding of the working of global economies and the incredible potential growth in emerging economies should ensure that recovery is comparable to other recessions.

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By: Michael Ham http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/08/18/japan-the-mother-of-all-miserable-recoveries/#comment-21129 Tue, 18 Aug 2009 15:42:28 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4922#comment-21129 I only skimmed through the article so correct me if you mentioned it, but Japan is the only country in the world with higher corporate taxes than the US. That has to have an effect on them getting out of this even slower than us.

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By: the Shah http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2009/08/18/japan-the-mother-of-all-miserable-recoveries/#comment-21126 Tue, 18 Aug 2009 15:25:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=4922#comment-21126 You swirl around the real point but don’t say it explicitly: business can’t re-invest in itself because it has to de-leverage first. A lot. It’s I suppose a similar theme to the public-at-large, too much debt that must be paid down before we feel comfortable buying the new car or house or big-screen TV. No stimulus or gov’t intervention can possibly change this, only delay it or slow the rate of it. Bottom-line, we need to accept the tme of de-leveraging and hope it goes as quickly as possible. As for businesses trying to gussy-up their balance sheet by slashing costs (which works out to our jobs, not bonuses for those #$&*^%#&), it’s ultimately self-defeating and will make the inevitable even more painful. Great depression move over, you’ve got company!

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