Comments on: Shifting global investments to clean energy http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/28/shifting-global-investments-to-clean-energy/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: brotherkenny4 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/28/shifting-global-investments-to-clean-energy/#comment-74425 Wed, 31 Jul 2013 17:24:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=22751#comment-74425 Your cost of energy will not be controlled by a cartel either. Oil and gas are finite and costs are constantly rising. Unless you want to be at the mercy of those that have the resource, even double the price is cheap when you consider the downs sides of being under the thumb of some nasty nations and corporations. You know, unless you like that kind of thing.

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By: brotherkenny4 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/28/shifting-global-investments-to-clean-energy/#comment-74424 Wed, 31 Jul 2013 17:13:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=22751#comment-74424 Cape Wind has signed a power purchase agreement with National Grid to sell half the project’s output (i.e. about 750GW·h per year) for an initial price of 20.7 ¢/kW·h (later reduced to 18.7¢— a price more than twice current retail rates.

So, people do pay premiums for green electricity. Because of some states green mandates there is a shortage of available green energy and thus it can be sold at a premium. The question is, how much does it cost to produce the electricity? That information would be more helpful if your intent is to edify us.

Operational cost, since you constantly buy and burn natural gas, are higher for a combined cycle natural gas plant. Again true edification would include an estimate of cost per kWh of electricity

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By: alpha2actual http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/28/shifting-global-investments-to-clean-energy/#comment-74376 Mon, 29 Jul 2013 23:44:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=22751#comment-74376 Cape Wind project in Nantucket Sound has been approved. The project will cost $2.6 BILLON, and it has secured funding for $2 BILLON of that from a Japanese bank. But this is believed to be subject to the project gaining a loan guarantee from the U.S. Department of Energy. The contracted cost of the wind farm’s energy will be 23 cents a kilowatt hour (excluding tax credits, which are unlikely to last the length of the project), which is more than 50% higher than current average electricity prices in Massachusetts. The Bay State is already the 4th most expensive state for electricity in the nation. Even if the tax credits are preserved, $940 million of the $1.6 billion contract represents costs above projections for the likely market price of conventional power. Moreover, these costs are just the initial costs they are scheduled to rise by 3.5 percent annually for 15 years. This project is rated at 468 MW and will produce 143 MW after applying a Capacity Factor of 30.4 % the time the wind actually blows.
A Combined Cycle Natural Gas plant studied by the DOE completed in 2010 is rated at 570 MW and produces 470 MW capacity factor 85%. Cost $311 MILLION.

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