Comments on: Forging ahead with free trade http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: sex tube http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-628367 Thu, 26 Mar 2015 02:20:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-628367 I value the blog post.Thanks Again. Awesome.

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By: rikfre http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76807 Thu, 03 Oct 2013 16:52:44 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76807 Harry, you are out of touch. You need to make the minimum wage and get back in touch. there will never be “free trade” because your people will never allow it.

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By: Cassiopian http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76744 Wed, 02 Oct 2013 22:42:51 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76744 The uninformed response to my comment, is simply that – uninformed. As for bilateral trade agreements, eighty percent of the American trade deficit is with countries with which the U.S. does not have a bilateral trade agreement, such as Germany, China, Japan, Ireland, and Italy. Moreover, the export/import ratio of the U.S. with its bilateral treaty trading partners, such as Canada and Mexico (both of which the U.S. imports considerable oil from), is much more balanced (even with all those oil imports!) than it is with the countries listed above, the non treaty countries.
In addition, it is ridiculous to think that somehow the U.S. can stand aside while the Europeans and others are signing bilateral trade agreements with countries like South Korea, which gives them a first mover advantage into these lucrative markets (S. Korea is the 7th largest economy in the world). If Boeing, John Deere, pharmaceutical, and other firms are to compete, and if they are to maintain American jobs, they have to have access to these markets on favorable terms.
In addition, the U.S. is the largest and most successful service exporter in the world – banking, financial, insurance, engineering, advertising – and the Obama administration is trying to further U.S. exports in this growing area, where U.S. firms have a competitive advantage.

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By: AlkalineState http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76735 Wed, 02 Oct 2013 21:15:54 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76735 International “Business Without Borders” Group Seeks to Promote Influx of Foreign Labor into your country, outflux of profits to a bank in the Cayman Islands.

Yay?

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By: AlkalineState http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76724 Wed, 02 Oct 2013 15:47:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76724 Protectionism is what makes nations money. America was built on a 20-30% import tariff. It was like that for 200 years. Now that we have dropped it to around 1%, and other nations have kept their tariffs high…. how has that benefitted America? It hasn’t.

We have one of the strongest, best developed marketplaces in the world. We should be charging for access to it. Return the import tariffs to 20%. Tariffs are direct revenue for treasury. And…. The price of underwear and plastic crap will rise. But so will wages here. Protectionism works.

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By: BidnisMan http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76719 Wed, 02 Oct 2013 10:27:10 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76719 Globalisation and free trade has caused global growth since the 90’s and at the same time, has increased global inequality and unhappiness. It is similar to the slave trade which was good most but unfair to some. We need a new way of working.

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By: UScitizentoo http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76701 Wed, 02 Oct 2013 01:39:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76701 > Bilateral free trade agreements are critical
> for U.S. prosperity
As clearly evidenced by the US’s stellar balance sheet, fantastic employment rate and current account debt of 12 (or is it 100 yet) trillion.
What a bunch of grade A garbage.

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By: anotherfakename http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76667 Tue, 01 Oct 2013 15:05:54 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76667 This article is outright propaganda to allow the 1% to sleep better, after destroying the economy of middle America. These liars for the rich always use the phrase ‘protectionism,’ as though protecting the middle class worker was akin to communism or socialism. Every trade agreement be it from Dem or Repub has put another nail in the coffin of middle America’s jobs to benefit a handful of already rich international corporate CEOs, who in turn bribe our political class with campaign contributions. The so called saving of our economy by the Fed did nothing for middle America, every bit of financial benefit went to the top, while the rest of us saw our real spending power decrease.

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By: TomMiles http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76664 Tue, 01 Oct 2013 14:45:27 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76664 Hi Harold. I am the Reuters reporter covering the WTO out of Geneva. I would take issue with your assertion that the G20 has supported free trade and opposed protectionism. G20 countries may have tried to abide by the WTO rulebook, but independent studies (notably the Global Trade Alert) show they are very busy with “stealth protectionism” that skirts the WTO rules.

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By: Cassiopian http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/30/forging-ahead-with-free-trade/#comment-76641 Tue, 01 Oct 2013 00:16:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=24611#comment-76641 Increasing trade (it is actually managed trade, not free trade) is critical to American and global prosperity. As the author notes the gains, in terms of increased efficiency and productivity,and with it higher economic growth, are robust.
There is not a successful economy in the world that is autarkic, while nations that trade extensively (as a % of GDP) are the wealthiest. American workers that work for firms that export have higher salaries and greater job stability than those who do not. And an increasing percentage of American exports rely on intermediate components imported from abroad. Consequently, protectionism isn’t shooting oneself in the foot, it is shooting oneself in the head. Moreover, the fastest economic growth rates recorded have occurred after WW II as markets opened up globally.
Bilateral free trade agreements are critical for U.S. prosperity, unless trade critics are willing to see American jobs appropriated by American competitors. There are about 300 such pacts in existence, with the U.S. participating in only about a dozen.
Unfortunately populists of all stripes seem to think that closing American borders will somehow benefit the American economy and somehow benefit American manufacturing. This is sheer fantasy and would lead to ruination, Russian style. When is the last time you purchased a Russian computer, software,auto?
However, dislocated workers have to be protected as much as is feasible, which is resisted tooth and nail by conservatives. And the benefits of trade have to be distributed more fairly through taxation and labor policies.
We cant save (in the U.S.) every textile job, or consumer electronics job, or rote assembly job as many such jobs are done more efficiently overseas. And these and other low value added jobs are decent jobs for a poorly educated Chinese factory girl but not for an American high school graduate for which we spend about $1000,000 educating.

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