Comments on: In defense of the NCAA http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: HBGuy http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85169 Mon, 31 Mar 2014 04:30:03 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85169 I am appalled that basketball even warrants serious discussion on the site. Apart from being the most boring sport on the planet (and generous allowance made for U.S. football), college basketball is nothing more than another money-making scheme for the NBA.

It also serves as an enabler for too many individuals who could never enter university without the lure of a sports scholarship. If universities choose to offer basketball programs, fine, but please stop doing so as a draw from the mentally challenged and as the main raison d’etre for an institution of higher learning’s being.

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By: hrlngrv http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85155 Sun, 30 Mar 2014 00:52:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85155 Why not tie post season eligibility for football and basketball to 50% graduation rate initially, rising to 80% over 20 years? Wouldn’t that reinforce the presumed benefit of the college education?

Let the players play for 4 years. Eliminate the penalty for transferring, though only allow transfers between academic years. Whichever college/university a player played for when their eligibility ended would have to allow them to complete their undergrad education. If some players aren’t ready for college work during their playing years, give them remedial instruction those years. Let the players complete their degrees free of charge after their 4 playing years are over. And any career-ending injuries would automatically be treated as completing 4 playing years.

This would cost colleges/universities, so naturally they’d resist, and the NCAA would never require it. Nevertheless without an absolute requirement that colleges/universities provide an actual undergrad education, possibly following a comprehensive remedial education, to all players who exhaust their eligibility, the current system will remain thoroughly corrupt.

IOW, the ideal may be sound, but the current implementation is woefully inadequate.

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By: DaleG http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85147 Sat, 29 Mar 2014 14:03:39 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85147 Pay-for-play minor leagues already exist (like the vast minor league baseball system and the NBA’s D-League), but many players choose to go to college anyway because, all things considered, the current system already compensates college athletes better than the minor leagues do. The issues is NOT that colleges refuse to compensate athletes: College athletes clearly ARE compensated. I read a column on Forbes a while back that claimed that full-scholarship athletes in D1 football programs commonly receive north of $100,000/year in scholarships, medical care, nutrition, personal training, etc.

The issue is that the NCAA has put a cap on what successful athletes are allowed to earn. The answer isn’t to REQUIRE teams to pay their athletes–they already do pay as competitively as they are allowed in the form of non-cash perks. The answer, in my opinion, is to ALLOW teams to pay and to ALLOW student athletes to earn. Not every team will pay every athlete, but particular top recruits will receive pay, and even athletes who do not receive pay will be able to at least earn money on the side.

Furthermore, this author argues that if we allow student athletes to be paid, then all of the best student athletes will choose a small cadre of the top-paying schools. She seems unaware that this is what already happens under the present system. Athletes already choose schools based on perks, and the schools with the best perks get the best athletes. Adding one more perk is not going to change much, except that there could be a reshuffling of which schools are considered the top schools for a given sport.

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By: CDN_Rebel http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85131 Fri, 28 Mar 2014 22:04:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85131 I find I have no sympathy for the student-athlete as they seem to get a pretty sweet deal. They are getting their shot at their dreams subsidized and it sounds as if all they want is to stick their hand out for more. Not only that, but the big money sports – basketball and football – are for the most part populated by student-athletes who have no right to be educated at an institution of higher learning since a) they have not the academic capability and b) they could not afford it.

With that being said, I think once an athlete has been granted a scholarship it should be valid for life and be considered satisfied once the athlete has graduated. I don’t think the athletes should be forced to do course-work during the athletic season, but at least one full semesters worth of credits should be completed per calendar year. I think athletes should get comprehensive healthcare coverage while enrolled. I think athletes should be able to work (as non-athletes) to earn some money. I don’t think athletes should be able to transfer from school to school to join a better ‘program’ unless they repay their original school before joining the new one.

I haven’t heard exactly what the demands are of the union, but if they are literally demanding pay-for-play they are out of their minds and spoiled-sick individuals. If they are lobbying for the things I mentioned above, more power to them.

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By: DonKrieger http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85095 Fri, 28 Mar 2014 12:01:47 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85095 Entrenched Corruption

Here in America intercollegiate athletics is the farm system for professional football, basketball, and others. It is strongly subsidized by state and municipal governments. This is corruption that is so strongly entrenched in our educational system that it is rarely even recognized.
The issues regarding athletes’ right to work or strike would be moot if the corruption was removed. The devastating head and other injuries, the extraordinary waste of human and material resources, the enormous debts incurred to build stadiums, the corruption of coaches and others as was seen in the Jerry Sandusky debacle … all of these would be eliminated with the demise of intercollegiate athletics and the NCAA.

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By: rikfre http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85053 Thu, 27 Mar 2014 17:22:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85053 I would love to turn the NIT tournament around and make it the Premier college basketball venue. One of the things I would do is give each player that made it to the Elite 8 at the Garden a bank card for them to enjoy the funds in the Big Apple (responsibly) The card would only be good in the 5 boroughs of NYC. Unfortunately, many small minds would not like that.

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By: Acetracy http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85034 Wed, 26 Mar 2014 18:59:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85034 Professional sports has no place in education, NONE. It is a travesty that major state schools (supported by tax dollars) are paying coaches $1.0 millions in salary, spending $10’s millions on sports facilities, yet pay an adjunct professor under $20K a year!

If students want to play sports, fine. However, college basketball, football, and the rest are only justified because they bind the alumni to the school. That’s complete nonsense. If a alumnus only gives money in order to see a football game, then the university has lost its mission: education.

The cost of higher education has escalated in the past 30 to 40 years on par with pharmaceutical prices – nearly 4x average annual CPI. Why? It’s not in the actual teaching salaries that has gone up. It’s the costs of administration ($1.0 million salary presidents, coaches, deans, provosts), grandiose buildings and sport facilities.

Sports in education is a major distraction and unneeded cost, not just in colleges, but also in high school. My southern high school had a major sports stadium but not even a chemistry lab. Math geniuses were nerds while football captains were heroes. And we wonder why the US is falling behind in educating its youth. The answer is simple. Get rid of sports in school.

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By: CharlesBierbach http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85022 Wed, 26 Mar 2014 15:06:33 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85022 Athletic scholarships should be contracts. Athletes should also get academic credit for practice and playing time that takes time away from studying. Under the contract, if the student athlete fails to graduate then the money must be paid back. If they graduate, then the contract has been fulfilled.

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By: edgyinchina http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85016 Wed, 26 Mar 2014 04:28:58 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85016 There are many more issue’s with the NCAA being a good organization for student-athletes, than just the paying of athletes. The NCAA has dozens of issues with its governance, with its fairness, and with its rules…. Money is just the ‘feel-good’ media story that draws the attention….

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By: Kahnie http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/03/25/in-defense-of-the-ncaa/#comment-85014 Wed, 26 Mar 2014 02:49:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=29643#comment-85014 The notion that education is the great benefit of college sports scholarships is right AS LONG AS the student-athlete graudates or even gets three years into the education. However, that is rarely the case in most colleges and universities, especially in the SEC. If listening to these athletes in an interview is any indication of education, the athlete is not getting any kind of education. This of course does not indude schools as in the Ivy League, Duke, Notre Dame, etc. With the scandals in many of the top athetic schools regarding the coures they take, or the courses they are enrolled in and don’t take but get grades, with the top stars quite often “going pro” after one or two years, I really wonder about the value of the education. I’m sure some take advantage and get a degree, but I’m more sure the university gets further in the “March Madness,” etc. to gain more money in the millions which is prize money in any sport, track included. Sorry, I don’t buy the premise of this story. More like a PR piece by the NCAA.

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