Comments on: Why the people crossing the Mediterranean aren’t ‘migrants’ http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 07:57:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: kobrigama http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1079550 Fri, 10 Jul 2015 12:29:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1079550 as soon as these people are picked up by officials, without proper papers, the authorities should deport them back to their country of origin. The problems are in the original country and those governments need to face those problems that make people leave i.e. overpopulation, unemployment, poverty, violence. The governments of the original countries are pleased to see people of poverty leave…less headaches for them…so send them back.

]]>
By: Solidar http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1078692 Wed, 08 Jul 2015 20:58:51 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1078692 The problem is Islam. They go crazy and kill people, and chase them into the sea. You can not have a peaceful world with a billion muslims. They eat their own.

]]>
By: GrajaganBrave http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076992 Sun, 05 Jul 2015 11:43:39 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076992 Simon Adams is correct in suggesting that 219 000 asylum seekers could be absorbed (in economic terms) into Europe, with a population of 511 million residents. In the 2014 calendar year Australia has begun to process and potentially settle 20 711 asylum seekers (majority boat arrivals) at a cost of AU$ 3.45 billion (GDP AU$1560 billion with a population of 22 million). Potentially this figure may have been closer to 30 000 boat arrivals if not for Australia’s highly contentious boat turn-back policy and notorious practice of indefinite mandatory detention (IMD) in offshore detention centres. IMD has been heavily criticised by the UNHCR for causing further serious damage to vulnerable people who have suffered trauma persecution. Economic figures stack up, however far greater challenges have surfaced regarding cultures from Africa and the Middle East meshing with our Western way of life. Who makes the decisions on what acceptable cultural behaviours are allowed to continue in an adopted land, and what practices are to be condemned. The 219 000 boat arrivals in Europe in 2014 were comprised of citizens of Syria 31%, Eritrea 12%, Afghanistan 11% and Somalia 6%. The prevalence of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Somalia accounts for 98% of women and young girls; Mali and Eritrea 89%; Sudan and Sierra Leone 88%. These cultural norms reflect deep-rooted inequality between sexes, extreme form of discrimination (nearly always carried out on minors) and is a degrading violation of the rights of children. Many males in countries of the war-torn Middle East (if not all) are completely comfortable in taking Minors for their child-bride, which is a violation of a person’s rights to health, security and physical integrity, and like FGM denies one’s rights to be free from torture and cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. Democracies of the West condemn such ancient, barbaric practices. However, if these barbaric norms are integral, and unassailable tenants of African and Middle Eastern cultures, can the cultures integrate successfully with more attractive destination countries. Who decides what cultural extremes are erased to meet acceptable ways of living in a ‘modern’ world. Recent studies have revealed that 60% of all Muslims have the potential to be Jihadists by way of their fundamentalist voting patterns. Best case scenarios state that there are a minimum of 180 million potential jihadists worldwide (maximum 225 million). There are many complex cultural perceptions to be addressed flowing from the current wave of displaced souls in transit.

]]>
By: Neurochuck http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076988 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 23:31:59 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076988 One can wonder why the United Nations, especially the UNHCR, is not quoted as strongly against the “people smuggling” trade. There are other millions of displaced people in their camps in places like Turkey, who are more clearly refugees to suffer such poor conditions for an indefinite term, and are more easily managed under various nations quotas.
The money spent on “combating” and rescuing customers of the people smugglers, who then need to be “processed” would go a long way in the UNHCR, and would not incite racist/political reactions in Europe.
It is even worse than the Mediterranean in the Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean – lots of sharks that start eating families clinging to wreckage when the cheap old fishing boat or ferry sinks. Not an industry to be promoted and expanded.

]]>
By: JacksonKidd http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076984 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 21:24:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076984 Wrong! The real crisis is overpopulation. The nations of the world need to deal with their own people. Where are the 1 billion people added to the population going to go and be feed 20 years from now? Europe? USA? Stop immigration and end the population crisis.

]]>
By: smith_9000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076978 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 18:51:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076978 Refugees? migrants? How about criminals and cowards. Criminals for knowingly entering another country illegally. Cowards for running rather that fighting for their country. These people are owed nothing and there is no justification to allow any of them to immigrate over those who follow the legal channels.

]]>
By: paulos http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076973 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:00:53 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076973 If asylum and safety was their sole concern then there are plenty of countries in Africa to go to. Syrians have the Middle East. These people are mainly economic migrants with some genuine asylum speakers mixed in with them. Look at the boat people – mainly young men. The problem is sorting out those who are genuine from the others that simply seak a better lifestyle. Europe can’t take everyone from the Middle East and Africa who would like a better income. Alternatives are needed.

]]>
By: notfooled2 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076971 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 14:54:39 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076971 Muslims.

]]>
By: hs7 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076950 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 13:50:56 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076950 >Europe is unlikely to become “overwhelmed” by the refugees. With a population of 511 million people, absorbing 200,000 refugees a year will hardly break its back.

Without a scheme to redistribute them between the various European countries the “511 million people” mean really little.

]]>
By: harrykrishna http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/07/02/why-the-people-crossing-the-mediterranean-arent-migrants/#comment-1076940 Sat, 04 Jul 2015 13:40:31 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/?p=41761#comment-1076940 you have written an article about semantics. they will keep coming as long as conditions persist in areas they left. so what makes you think europe can easily absorb these people?

]]>