The Great Debate

iPhone 6, Apple Watch and Tim Cook all impress, but questions remain

By Chris Morris
September 9, 2014

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Tim Cook has had his first Steve Jobs moment.

With Tuesday’s introduction of the new iPhone 6 line, Apple Pay and Apple Watch, the company’s CEO escaped the public shadow of his revered predecessor. Now the question is: Can he deliver in the same impressive fashion?

from Stories I’d like to see:

How much money is raised and spent in fighting cancer?

By Steven Brill
September 9, 2014

Actress Paltrow is interviewed as she arrives for the fourth biennial Stand Up To Cancer fundraising telecast in Hollywood

1. Cancer money:

The Stand Up to Cancer telethon -- simulcast Friday night on all four major broadcast networks and 28 cable channels, and live-streamed on Yahoo and Hulu (available on YouTube here) -- reminded me of a story I have long wanted to read: How much money is being spent on cancer research, where is it going and how well is it being spent?

Trying to find a women’s gym in Saudi Arabia? Ask for the ‘make-up room’

By Arlene Getz
September 8, 2014

A woman drives a car in Saudi Arabia

Pity the female athlete in Saudi Arabia. Once again, the country is sending an all-male team to the Asian Games in South Korea — justifying its decision on the grounds that its women don’t quite make the grade. Officially, the line is that they’re not competitive enough. But how can anyone be a competitor in a country where just getting out to work out is almost impossible?

Israel appropriated 1,000 acres of the West Bank. Why now?

By Dimi Reider
September 8, 2014

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Last week, Israel announced that it was appropriating nearly 1,000 acres of private Palestinian land near Bethlehem. The seizure, which one anti-settlement group called the largest in 30 years, was condemned by Palestinians, the United Nations, and criticized by the United States.

from Ian Bremmer:

Chinese leader’s reforms are bad news for Hong Kong protesters

By Ian Bremmer
September 8, 2014

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In 1997, Britain returned Hong Kong to China after some 150 years of colonial rule. In exchange, China agreed to a set of principles: Hong Kong would maintain its capitalist system for half a century, by which point its chief executive and members of the legislature would be elected by universal suffrage. As the thinking went, “one country, two systems” would suffice in the interim; Hong Kong and the Mainland would surely converge on democracy in the half-century to come.

iPhone 6: What does Apple have to reveal Tuesday to stay on top?

By Chris Morris
September 7, 2014

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It’s been a while since we’ve had a true ‘Apple moment’ at one of its press events. Tuesday’s expected introduction of the iPhone 6 (and possibly more) could end that drought.

Tuesday’s big iPhone 6 question: Is Apple done leading from behind?

By Jason Fields
September 7, 2014

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For the last few years, Apple’s iPhones have been a little like the U.S. role in the war against Muammar Gaddafi in Libya — leading from behind.

Not one woman gets her own pedestal among Central Park’s statues

By Chloe Angyal
September 5, 2014

The Central Park statue of Dr. James Marion Sims is pictured along 5th Ave in the Manhattan borough of New York

There are 50 statues in New York’s Central Park, one of the world’s most visited spots. Not one of them is of a woman who exists outside of fiction.

Plans to stop Russia show NATO and the West are in denial

By Masha Gessen
September 4, 2014

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For more than six months now, since Russia annexed Crimea, Western politicians and analysts have been asking what can make Vladimir Putin stop or retreat. It’s the wrong question, and the policies that have flowed from the resulting debate have been misguided, because they are based on the fallacy that the West can do something to influence Putin’s actions.

from Edward Hadas:

Russia-Ukraine conflict shows money isn’t the root of all war

By Edward Hadas
September 3, 2014

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Many people think politics is really a branch of economics. When the United States invaded Iraq in 1991, the common cry was that it was all about oil. On the same thinking, rich countries were indifferent to the brutal civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo – which has cost 5.4 million lives, according to the International Rescue Committee – because the economic stakes were too low to matter. This economic reductionism goes on in developed countries too. Pundits and pollsters argue that elections are won and lost above all else on the economy.