The Great Debate

What’s between the covers of al Qaeda’s ‘Inspire’ magazine

By Peter Van Buren
September 3, 2014

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Inspire is an English-language online magazine published since 2010 by al Qaeda. I just read the latest issue and found a lot of what I expected, and some things I didn’t.

How to prevent Westerners from fighting for the Islamic State and al Qaeda

By Aki Peritz
September 3, 2014

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One of the most troubling aspects of the slaying of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff is that a well-spoken man with a British accent appears to have been the killer. The fact that an educated Westerner slaughtered other educated Westerners and then put their murder tapes on the Web was enough to dominate the news cycle.

from Breakingviews:

Why Citigroup would be better in bits

September 2, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Nine years ago, Breakingviews proposed an “extreme idea” to Citigroup’s then-leader Charles Prince. The $240 billion New York bank’s market capitalization was lower than the worth of its parts valued separately. By splitting into three separate units, the idea was, Prince could hand shareholders an extra $50 billion or so, the equivalent of one entire U.S. Bancorp at the time.

Five smart takes explain the Russia-Ukraine conflict from square one

By Amana Fontanella-Khan
September 2, 2014

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Ever since the Ukrainian revolution in February this year, the Eastern European country has witnessed spiraling political instability and bloodshed.

US strategy vs. Islamic State: Better right than fast

September 2, 2014

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In her recently published memoir Hard Choices, former Senator Hillary Clinton recounts the meeting, nine days after the election of 2008, when President-elect Barack Obama first asked her to be his secretary of state. He “presented a well-considered argument,” she writes, “explaining that he would have to concentrate most of his time and attention on the economic crisis and needed someone of stature to represent him abroad.”

Here’s the current status of new drugs to fight Ebola virus and what works best now

By Celine Gounder
September 2, 2014

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Experts will be meeting this week at the World Health Organization (WHO) to discuss the role of new drugs and vaccines to help control the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Last month, the WHO said that it is ethical to provide experimental drugs and vaccines for Ebola, but that there’s also a “moral duty” to conduct clinical trials of these experimental drugs and vaccines to determine whether they’re safe and effective. At the same time, a new study released last week shows that the Ebola virus is mutating rapidly, which could make it more transmissible or reduce the effectiveness of drugs and vaccines in the pipeline.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

What’s Europe’s best hope for avoiding a second euro crisis?

By Anatole Kaletsky
August 29, 2014

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This week’s theatrical resignation threat by Manuel Valls, the French prime minister, combined with deep European anxiety about deflation, suggest that the euro crisis may be coming back. But a crisis is often an opportunity, and this is the hope now beginning to excite markets in the eurozone.

It’s harder to reach the American dream if you’re reaching all alone

By Robert L. Borosage
August 29, 2014

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“Hours of chaos” is how the New York Times described the work reality of more and more Americans. It highlighted Jannette Navarra, a Starbucks barrista, who is regularly forced to work part-time with fluctuating hours. She usually gets her work schedule three days ahead of the workweek, so she is always scrambling to arrange childcare for her son. Any hope Navarra has of advancing by pursuing a degree is shattered by her inability to schedule classes.

Finding hell in Syria’s Qusayr

By James Palmer
August 29, 2014
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Click picture for a gallery of James Palmer’s photographs

In the summer of 2012, I spent three weeks in the besieged Syrian town of Qusayr working as a freelance photographer and writer with a group of young anti-Assad activists in a second-floor apartment next door to a field hospital. Regardless of whether I was working or sleeping, I raced downstairs to shoot photos whenever I thought heard casualties arrive.

Crossing paths with James Foley in Syria’s desperate war

By James Palmer
August 29, 2014
PzxkuFKh30zIFwrseFS7uQ-ljcnLRdu59URJQOlVX94.jpg Click the image for a full gallery of James Palmer’s photographs from Syria. I prefer to work alone because I’ve found from past experience it’s just easier.

Still, it was hard not to cross paths with other journalists in Syria in the late summer and fall of 2012, where you were free to roam without government restrictions.