The Great Debate

Citizens United gives freedom of speech back to the people

By Bradley A. Smith
January 16, 2015
Voters fill in their ballots at a polling place located in Shoaf's Wagon Wheel during the U.S. midterm elections in Salisbury

Voters at a polling place located in Shoaf’s Wagon Wheel in Salisbury, North Carolina, November 4, 2014. REUTERS/Chris Keane

Meet the four autocrats of the apocalypse

By John Lloyd
January 16, 2015
Russian President Putin attends a meeting with his counterpart from Venezuela Maduro at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with his counterpart from Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, Jan. 15, 2015. REUTERS/Pavel Golovkin/Pool

from Breakingviews:

Bitcoin is latest victim of disinflation

By Edward Hadas
January 16, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Tycoon dough: The ultimate electoral martial art

By Lawrence Norden and Daniel Weiner
January 16, 2015
supreme-court-perspective

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, May 20, 2009. REUTERS/Molly Riley

This is first article in the Reuters series on the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, handed down Jan. 21, 2010. After five years, is anything the same in U.S. elections? You can read other pieces in the series here.

Democracy is drowning in a sea of dark money

By Fred Wertheimer
January 16, 2015
Voters fill in their ballots as they vote in the U.S. midterm elections at a polling place in Westminster, Colorado

Voters fill in their ballots in the midterm elections at a polling place in Westminster, Colorado, November 4, 2014. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

To become ‘French,’ abandon who you are

By Justin Gest
January 16, 2015
YOUNG MUSLIM PROTESTER SEEN DURING STREET PROTEST OF SIKHS AGAINST FRENCH BAN ON RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS ...

PHOTO (TOP): A young Muslim girl has two French flags and a headband reading “Fraternity” on her headscarf while marching to protest a French ban on religious symbols in state schools, Paris, January 31, 2004. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

Do Americans trust their cops to be fair and just? New poll contains surprises.

By Bill Schneider
January 15, 2015
A police officer gives a thumbs while arresting a demonstrator during a protest against police violence towards minorities at Grand Central Station in New York

A police officer gives a thumbs up while arresting a demonstrator during a protest against police violence towards minorities at Grand Central Station in New York January 15, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: It took the Grim Reaper to restructure GM

January 14, 2015

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Netanyahu’s invitation to French Jews was awkward. For many reasons.

By Dimi Reider
January 14, 2015

French President Francois Hollande welcomes Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the Elysee Palace before attending a solidarity march in the streets of Paris

On Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made an impassioned call for French Jews to immigrate to Israel, after a series of attacks that began on the day of the Charlie Hebdo massacre killed four in a kosher supermarket in Paris. To many, it seemed like the most natural response he could deliver. After all, this is Israel’s stated raison d’etre: to provide refuge to persecuted Jews, wherever they may be. Underlying this sentiment is a deeper one, shared by Israelis across the political spectrum. It is the idea that Jewish life is at its most meaningful, and relevant, if carried out in the Jewish state.

Germany’s anti-immigrant PEGIDA isn’t a Vladimir Putin plot. It’s scarier.

By Lucian Kim
January 14, 2015

Participants hold a banner during a demonstration called by anti-immigration group PEGIDA, a German abbreviation for "Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West", in Dresden

Last week, when I attended my first rally in Dresden organized by PEGIDA, Germany’s mysterious “anti-Islamization” movement, I was reminded of the aggressive pro-Russian protests that tore apart eastern Ukraine a year ago. Thousands of demonstrators, who mostly refused to talk to the “lying press,” listened to fiery speeches railing against the country’s political class. Among the German flags present, I also spotted a few Russian ones, including a banner that was split diagonally, one half Russia’s tricolor, the other half Germany’s. A reporter and cameraman from the Gazprom-owned NTV channel were greeted with welcoming calls of “Vladimir! Vladimir!”