The Great Debate

U.S. sanctions fail two-thirds of the time. And allies are often to blame

By Bryan Early
January 5, 2015
Handout photo of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un guiding the multiple-rocket launching drill of women's sub-units under KPA Unit 851

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un guides a multiple-rocket launching drill in this undated photo released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang, Dec. 30, 2014. REUTERS/KCNA

Predictions 2015: Oil prices will stay below $100, and more

January 5, 2015

 

By Richard Beales

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The return of the lira? This year, Italy’s fate hangs in the balance.

By John Lloyd
January 5, 2015

An employee of Editalia shows a silver reproduction of 500 Italian lira as part of a coin collections in Rome

FLORENCE, Italy – Italian Prime Minster Matteo Renzi, the youngest leader in Europe, faces a national economic morass that, if not decisively addressed in the coming months, could bring down the entire 17-nation eurozone. 

Mario Cuomo: Hero or ‘Hamlet on the Hudson,’ depending on who you ask

By Jason Fields
January 2, 2015
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Mario Cuomo, who died yesterday, was a liberal lion or a dithering do-gooder, depending on which New York publication you ask.

Navalny is a thorn in Putin’s side, but silencing him won’t be easy

By Lucian Kim
December 31, 2014

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In Russia, August is commonly believed to be the month of bad surprises, when planes fall out of the sky and economic crises begin. But from the point of the view of the Kremlin, the last days of December are preferable for shock announcements. On Christmas Day 1991, Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as the first and last president of the Soviet Union; eight years later, on New Year’s Eve, Boris Yeltsin handed over the Russian presidency to an unknown former secret police chief named Vladimir Putin.

NYPD v. Bill de Blasio: Why New York’s mayor, police are at odds

By Leonard Levitt
December 31, 2014

Blasio walks away from the podium after speaking to the New York City Police Academy Graduating class in New York

Last week at the funeral of police officer Rafael Ramos — who was assassinated with his partner, Wenjian Liu, as they sat in their patrol car — cops literally turned their backs on New York Mayor Bill de Blasio in a show of disrespect. Many in the police department blame what they see as his anti-police policies for the two cops’ deaths.

Why Vladimir Putin is a hero to some in Western Europe, too

By Andrea Mammone
December 31, 2014

Russian President Putin is seen on a screen during his annual end-of-year news conference in Moscow

During the Cold War era, Western communists often looked to Moscow for ideological inspiration, economic help and political support. The Soviet Union, for its part, was more than happy to oblige. Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, communism is long gone, but some European party leaders are once more reviving ties with Russia, for very different reasons.

My union right or wrong: Should rogue cops and football players be defended?

By Nelson Lichtenstein
December 30, 2014

Law enforcement officers turn their backs on a live video monitor showing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has he speaks at the funeral of slain New York Police Department (NYPD) officer Rafael Ramos near Christ Tabernacle Church in the Queens borough of

Unions of football players and police officers are still strong organizations — even as the rest of the labor movement unravels. But scandal in the National Football League and murder on the streets of New York City has many people asking if these high-profile unions are too strident in defending their members.

from Breakingviews:

Ukraine crisis forced into suspended animation for 2015

December 29, 2014

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Russian, Chinese ‘news’ coming to a TV near you

By John Lloyd
December 29, 2014

Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen on the screen of a television camera during his visit to the new studio complex of television channel 'Russia Today' in Moscow

Earlier this month, the British Broadcasting Corporation, which sees itself as still the best broadcaster in the world, gave a well-bred expression of fear. Peter Horrocks, who has just stepped down as head of the BBC World Service, said “we are being financially outgunned by Russia and the Chinese (broadcasters) … the role we need to play is an even handed one. We shouldn’t be pro one side or the other, we need to provide something people can trust.”