The Great Debate

After MH17: The technical fix that could protect civilian airliners from missile attacks

July 18, 2014

Site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash is seen at the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region

The awful crash of Malaysian Flight 17 in the eastern Ukraine combat zone seems likely to have been caused by a long-range surface-to-air missile. At this writing, who launched the missile remains undetermined. Regardless of who’s guilty — why is a modern software-driven weapon capable of striking a civilian jet in the first place?

What’s behind the downing of Flight MH17 over Ukraine, and what happens next? Five smart views.

By Helen Coster
July 18, 2014

Armed pro-Russian separatist stands at a site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash in the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region

On Thursday Malaysian Airlines Flight 17, with 298 people on board, was shot down over Grabovo, Ukraine, by what officials have described as a Russian-made antiaircraft missile. As investigators uncover details of the attack — including the origins of the missile — Russian President Vladimir Putin’s role in the Ukraine crisis will come under renewed scrutiny. Below are five takes on what happened and why, as well as what the consequences will be.

In Iran talks, ‘no deal’ bests ‘bad deal’ for U.S.

By Joseph I. Lieberman
July 18, 2014

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif meets with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at talks between the foreign ministers of the six powers negotiating with Tehran on its nuclear program in Vienna

With only days to go before the original July 20 deadline for negotiations over the future Iran’s nuclear program, there is scant sign that a breakthrough is imminent. The reason is simple: Iranian leaders’ refusal to move from what a senior Obama administration official recently described as “unworkable and inadequate positions that would not in fact assure that their program is exclusively peaceful.”

from Ian Bremmer:

World Cup chants reveal true state of U.S.-German relations

By Ian Bremmer
July 17, 2014

 Germany's national soccer players acknowledge their fans after their win over the U.S. at the end of their 2014 World Cup Group G soccer match at the Pernambuco arena in Recife

As Germany basks in its World Cup victory, it’s easy to forget that one of the most telling geopolitical moments of the tournament came during the Germany-U.S. game. As American fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!” the Germans countered with, “N-S-A! N-S-A! N-S-A!”

If at first you don’t succeed in Iraq, Surge, Surge again

By Peter Van Buren
July 17, 2014

Major-General Hertling, the commander of U.S. forces in northern Iraq, walks during a battlefield circulation patrol on the streets in Mosul

America’s new strategy for resolving the Sunni-Shi’ite crisis in Iraq? The Surge — again.

from John Lloyd:

As Israel attacks Gaza, Jews elsewhere feel an impact

By John Lloyd
July 16, 2014

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As the death toll in Gaza rises, so does anger against Israel -- and sometimes, by extension, Jews -- in Europe and elsewhere.

from Breakingviews:

Dual-share inequity to figure in Time Warner fight

July 16, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Getting to ‘yes’ on the Iran nuclear deal

By Greg Thielmann
July 16, 2014

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif addresses the media during a news conference in Vienna

Iran’s past nuclear efforts are among the many thorny issues in the continuing Iran nuclear talks. But focusing on the past is a mistake. Instead of insisting on knowing all about what Iran’s nuclear program looked like 10 years ago, the United States and its allies should focus on preventing Tehran from building a nuclear weapon in the future.

from Jack Shafer:

The truth is, you’ve never had the ‘right to be forgotten’

By Jack Shafer
July 15, 2014

An illustration picture shows a Google logo with two one Euro coins

A recent ruling by Europe's top court has given its people a "right to be forgotten." Google and other search engines must now delete "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant, or excessive" information from search queries when a European individual requests it, even when the info is true. This isn't a classic case of censorship: the "offending" pages produced by newspapers and other websites will go untouched. Google and the other search engines just won't be allowed to link to them.

from Breakingviews:

As KFC doubles down in China, will profits roost elsewhere?

July 15, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.