The Great Debate

Trump follows in the footsteps of man he claims to despise

By Bruce J. Schulman
January 15, 2016
carter-trump1 (2)

Jimmy Carter (L) waving at the Democratic National Convention in New York, 1976. Library of Congress/Warren Leffler; Donald Trump waves to the crowd at the end of a Republican presidential candidate forum in Aiken, South Carolina, December 12, 2015. REUTERS/Christopher Aluka Berry

Will scandals simply overwhelm Hillary Clinton?

By Suzanne Garment
January 13, 2016
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures as she walks on stage at a Democratic fundraising dinner featuring all three candidates in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2016.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Hillary Clinton walks on stage at a Democratic fundraising dinner in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Truth is Superman, but Donald Trump is pure Kryptonite

By Suzanne Garment
December 15, 2015
Donald Trump on the USS Iowa in San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, September 15, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on the USS Iowa in San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, United States September 15, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY – RTS1ASG

Yes, the media is to blame for the GOP primary mess

By Bill Schneider
November 18, 2015
Republican Presidential candidates Donald Trump takes interviews in the spin room after the debate held by Fox Business Network for the top 2016 U.S. Republican candidates in Milwaukee, Wisconsin November 10, 2015.REUTERS/Darren Hauck - RTS6EQX

Republican Presidential candidates Donald Trump n the spin room after the Republican presidential candidate debate held by Fox Business Network in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, November 10, 2015.REUTERS/Darren Hauck

Forget the debate: Two simple reasons a Republican will likely win in 2016

By Clifford Young and Julia Clark
October 14, 2015
Reporters get a tour of the room where democratic presidential candidates will debate at the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas

Reporters get a tour of the room where democratic presidential candidates will debate at the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada October 13, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Trump’s ready to deal, and a lot of uncompromising conservatives agree

By Bill Schneider
August 25, 2015
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Hampton

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Hampton, New Hampshire August 14, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Focusing on 2016, GOP governors overlook their own states

By Bill Schneider
July 7, 2015
Wisconsin Governor and potential Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate Scott Walker greets supporters at a rally for Congressman Rod Blum (R-IA) in Cedar Rapids

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker at a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, April 24, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young

Perry’s indictment: Crime and punishment, Texas-style

By Suzanne Garment
August 27, 2014

Texas Governor Perry, a possible Republican candidate for 2016 presidential race, answers questions from reporters following appearance at business leaders luncheon in Portsmouth

It’s a big country, where states have their own legal peculiarities, political cultures and definitions of what makes a debilitating political scandal. Take Texas, for example, where the Republican governor, Rick Perry, has been indicted for abuse of office.

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More questions for Snowden and the GOP establishment takes on the 2016 primaries

By Steven Brill
June 3, 2014

Accused government whistleblower Snowden is seen on a screen as he speaks via videoconference with members of the Committee on legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg

1. Snowden questions NBC missed:

In his interview with NBC’s Brian Williams last week, Edward Snowden tried to bolster his credentials this way: “I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word -- in that I lived and worked undercover, overseas, pretending to work in a job … and even being assigned a name that was not mine …. Now, the government might deny these things. They might frame it in certain ways, and say, ‘Oh, well, you know, he's a low-level analyst.’”