Last fall, my high school history teacher showed our class a documentary called Invisible Children. It was amazing: We got to know a boy in Uganda named Jacob, who shared his fears about being abducted again and talked about why he would never be normal. It made me want to do something, though I wasn’t sure how I could help.

The movie had been made in 2005. Then on Mar. 5, Invisible Children Inc. released a video on YouTube about Joseph Kony, head of Uganda’s Lord’s Resistance Army, based partly on the documentary.

When I saw the video I decided I had to show my family. It was very moving, even more so than the original movie, and was deliberately directed toward teenagers. It showed young kids doing something — putting up posters, wearing bracelets and T-shirts, and writing letters to politicians and celebrities. I decided I wanted be a part of this.

I got on Facebook and created a group called “Blanket Marin,” with a goal of creating a big event on the designated day, Apr. 20. In two days, 216 people had already agreed to join in. We were going to cover Marin in posters to make Joseph Kony infamous.

I’ve since seen the criticism of the Kony 2012 campaign, and I think a lot of the people who don’t like it are missing the point.