The Great Debate

iPhone 6: What does Apple have to reveal Tuesday to stay on top?

September 7, 2014

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It’s been a while since we’ve had a true ‘Apple moment’ at one of its press events. Tuesday’s expected introduction of the iPhone 6 (and possibly more) could end that drought.

Tuesday’s big iPhone 6 question: Is Apple done leading from behind?

September 7, 2014

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For the last few years, Apple’s iPhones have been a little like the U.S. role in the war against Muammar Gaddafi in Libya — leading from behind.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: GE should put itself up for sale

By Rob Cox
April 1, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Inside the Apple and Google smartphone war

November 15, 2013

This is an excerpt from DOGFIGHT: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution by Fred Vogelstein, published in October 2013 by Sarah Crichton Books, an imprint of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC.

Apple: ‘Early adopter’ as fashionista

October 18, 2013

To much fanfare, Apple announced Tuesday that Angela Ahrendts is resigning as chief executive officer of Burberry and joining the inner circle in Cupertino, California. “Apple-polishing” has become the headline du jour. Picturing the soignée Ahrendts surrounded by geeks in jeans and hoodies, we might be forgiven for wondering why Apple feels in need of a fashionista buff-up. After all, there is hardly a product line more shiny-bright than Apple’s — or one with less affinity to the cold exclusivity of the world’s great fashion houses.

from The Great Debate UK:

Apple attempts to become fashionable

October 16, 2013

The UK lost one of only three female CEOs on the FTSE 100 on Tuesday, as Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts quit. My concerns about females at the top aside, the interesting thing about Apple’s new hire is the link between Apple and fashion and what it tells us about the evolution of the tech industry.

What does Apple really owe taxpayers? A lot, actually.

June 18, 2013

Even as Apple sizzles in the Senate hot seat for alleged tax evasion and finds itself the object of a Justice Department investigation into price-fixing e-books, the company still enjoys a vast reservoir of good faith with the American people. But if Apple doesn’t reexamine its relationship to those who made its success possible, that well could one day run dry.

The dark side of shareholder activism

April 12, 2013

Shareholder activism sounds so respectable, even noble. The phrase conjures images of good-corporate-governance folk fighting greedy or dysfunctional management in the company’s best interest. While shareholders can be disciplinarians who right the wrongs of abusive directors, many boardroom activists advance some of the most destructive short-term thinking in business today.

Apple and Samsung’s cone of silence

October 17, 2012

Apple and Samsung, you might have heard, have spent the last many months in a California courtroom haggling over who violated whose patents. At the end of August, Apple was awarded more than a billion dollars in damages by a jury, and the Samsung is now claiming jury misconduct. Just last week a U.S. appeals court threw out the judge’s ban on Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus phone. The whole situation is, really, turning into a bit of a confusing mess.

from Paul Smalera:

Paradise regained: Clayton Christensen and the path to salvation

June 29, 2012

Is it possible in the year of our Lord 2012 that leadership still isn't well understood? In 2012, despite business journalism’s fetishization of Steve Jobs, the most successful leader ever, whose apotheosis was Walter Isaacson’s doorstop, Steve Jobs, a biography of the half-Syrian, bearded man who built the world’s most valuable company, brick by brick, and found himself, like an earlier CEO of sorts, with legions of devoted apostles, some powerful enemies, and an inextinguishable legend? Is it possible, despite the endless streams of management self-help articles burbling out of Fast Company, Inc., Harvard Business Review, Businessweek, Fortune and the blogs of droves of self-appointed leadership gurus, we need more advice? And is it possible despite the emails – so many emails, Jesus wept – those emails that aggregate all this content using algorithms and intern labor, and slice it up so that the middle manager in Minnesota and the lawyer in Los Angeles and the new media marketer in New York are all .0058% more likely to click through to a relevant article? Is it possible, really possible, the answer to our prayers is another book on leadership?