The Great Debate

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: Fragility bigger worry than volatility

October 21, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

A free lunch for America

By J. Bradford DeLong
September 30, 2011

By J. Bradford DeLong
The opinions expressed are his own.

Former US Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers had a good line at the International Monetary Fund meetings this year: governments, he said, are trying to treat a broken ankle when the patient is facing organ failure. Summers was criticizing Europe’s focus on the second-order issue of Greece while far graver imbalances – between the EU’s north and south, and between reckless banks’ creditors and governments that failed to regulate properly – worsen with each passing day.

from Global Investing:

Solar activities and market cycles

November 29, 2010

Can nature's cycles enrich our finance and market theories?

Market predictions based on the alignment of the sun, moon and the earth and other cycles could help investors stay disciplined and profit in economic storms, says Daniel Shaffer, CEO of Shaffer Asset Management.

We are all widows and orphans now

August 26, 2010

It may seem like a  world turned upside down: stocks are desired for their dividends and bonds are all about capital appreciation, or at least preservation.

Stocks from Venus, bonds from Mars

August 17, 2010

Forget about politics, the biggest divide in the U.S. is between stock and bond investors, who aren’t so much arguing as speaking entirely different languages.

Stocks, bonds and the earnings season dance

August 5, 2010

A look at company earnings implies it is a great time to be a corporation in America, but for investors a rising savings rate and the threat of deflation mean that, ugly and risky as they are, government bonds looks good in comparison to stocks.

from The Great Debate UK:

Banks, borrowing, bonds and Britain’s budget

June 21, 2010

BRITAIN/

-Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School and a co-author of “Verdict on the Crash” published by the Institute of Economic Affairs. The opinions expressed are his own. Join Reuters for a live discussion with guests as UK Chancellor George Osborne makes  an emergency budget statement at 12:30 p.m. British time on Tuesday, June 22, 2010.-

from MacroScope:

Political economy and the euro

February 8, 2010

The reality of  'political economy'  is something that irritates many economists -- the "purists", if you like. The political element is impossible to model;  it often flies in the face of  textbook economics;  and democratic decision-making and backroom horse trading can be notoriously difficult to predict and painfully slow.  And political economy is all pervasive in 2010 -- Barack Obama's proposals to rein in the banks is rooted in public outrage; reading China's monetary and currency policies is like Kremlinology; capital curbs being introduced in Brazil and elsewhere aim to prevent market overshoot; and British budgetary policies are becoming the political football ahead of this spring's UK election. The list is long, the outcomes uncertain, the market risk high.

from The Great Debate UK:

The economy: reasons to be miserable

June 2, 2009

Laurence Copeland- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own. -