The Great Debate

Despite pending referendum, UK is not European Union’s weakest link

April 1, 2016
A model presents a creation made with chocolate by designer Wang Jingzhi and Maitre Chocolatier Roberto Rinaldini during the international exhibition of chocolate "Salon du Chocolat" in Milan, Italy, February 12, 2016.  REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini

A model presents a creation made with chocolate by designer Wang Jingzhi and Maitre Chocolatier Roberto Rinaldini during the international exhibition of chocolate “Salon du Chocolat” in Milan, Italy, February 12, 2016. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini

Europe could be doomed. But Britain should stay in anyway.

March 17, 2016
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, holds up his budget case for the cameras as he stands outside number 11 Downing Street, before delivering his budget to the House of Commons, in London, Britain, March 16, 2016.    REUTERS/Toby Melville TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY  - RTSAOPR

Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, holds up his budget case for the cameras as he stands outside number 11 Downing Street, before delivering his budget to the House of Commons, in London, Britain, March 16, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville

The only safe way to make a nuclear deal with Iran

July 6, 2015
U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at a hotel in Vienna

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Secretary of State John Kerry and Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman (L-3rd L) meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (2nd R) at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, June 28, 2015. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Are the U.S. and UK still BFFs? It doesn’t really matter.

May 14, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama walks with Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron during the G8 summit at the Lough Erne golf resort in Enniskillen

President Barack Obama walks with British Prime Minister David Cameron during the G8 summit in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, June 18, 2013. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

Britain votes: Who’s who in the UK election?

By Reuters
May 1, 2015

Britons head to the polls for the UK general election on May 7 in what has been described as the closest race to No. 10 Downing Street since the 1970s.

from Hugo Dixon:

Will UK leave the EU? Election may help decide, but it won’t be simple

April 27, 2015

Britain's Prime Minister Cameron joins local supporters in a 'selfie' photograph whilst campaigning in Norton Sub Hamdon near Yeovil, south west England, Britain

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (C) joins local supporters in a 'selfie' photograph whilst campaigning in Norton Sub Hamdon near Yeovil, south west England, April 25, 2015. REUTERS/Toby Melville

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why Britain’s days as a haven of political, economic stability are numbered

November 21, 2014

Flares are let off as police stand guard while pro-union protestors clash with pro-independence protestors during a demonstration at George Square in Glasgow

For the past five years, Britain has been a haven of political and economic stability amid the turbulence in Europe. No longer.

Metaphor meets reality: U.S. and China are clearing the air

November 17, 2014

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Barack Obama arrive for a group photo at the G20 summit in Brisbane

History has no on-off buttons. Change is never instantaneous. But President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent accord on greenhouse gases may allow the world to start dialing down dangerous carbon emissions.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

It ain’t over yet: Last-minute promises to Scotland will scar the UK

September 26, 2014

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre in Aberdeen, Scotland

Astonishing as it was to contemplate the breakup of Europe’s most stable nation-state threatened by last week’s Scottish referendum, we now have an even more extraordinary possibility. In the days since the Scottish voters rejected secession 55 percent to 45 percent, a new threat has suddenly appeared to blight Britain’s political and economic prospects for years ahead. It now looks like Britain may be dissolved by one rogue opinion poll.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why breaking up Britain could tear apart the EU, too

September 12, 2014

A bunch of 'Yes' balloons are seen as Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond campaigns in Edinburgh, Scotland

While recent opinion polls have swung slightly back toward the "no" camp, there remains a distinct possibility that Thursday's Scottish referendum will trigger a previously unthinkable breakup of Britain.