The Great Debate

Why the 2016 Republican nominee is likely to be chosen by the blue states

By Bill Schneider
February 17, 2015
Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush addresses delegates during the final session of the Republican National Convention in Tampa

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush addresses delegates at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012 REUTERS/Mike Segar

Vaccines: The best way to persuade parents is the worst for kids

By Lisa Sanders
February 4, 2015
Lauren Durbin is given an MMR injection at the Paediatric Outpatient department at Morriston Hospital in Swansea

Lauren Durbin, aged 10 months, is given an MMR injection by Sister Sian Owen at the Paediatric Outpatients department at Morriston Hospital in Swansea, south Wales, April 6, 2013. REUTERS/Rebecca Naden

The most expensive political contest in California is for an office nobody’s heard of

By Sherry Bebitch Jeffe and Douglas Jeffe
November 3, 2014

A woman inserts her ballot into an intake machine at a polling station during the U.S. presidential election in Los Angeles

On Tuesday, California may not have a suspenseful governor’s race, but the contest for an obscure state education post has attracted an astonishing amount of outside money and turned into a high-stakes test run for the 2016 presidential campaign.

You can’t blame immigrants for gun violence

By Mike Males
July 24, 2014

A pile of handguns are placed in a trash bin after they were surrendered during a gun buyback program in Los Angeles, California

The eruption of anti-immigrant fury over the federal government’s plans to temporarily relocate undocumented Latino children to shelters and Border Patrol facilities in Murietta, California, and other cities, is largely founded on the expressed belief that immigrants bring drugs and crime, threatening the safety of communities.

Why is the West betting against climate change?

By Richard Schiffman
May 19, 2014

The Las Pulgas Fire is seen burning near military structures at Camp Pendleton, California

With wildfires ravaging San Diego County, this year’s fire season is getting off to an early — and destructive — start.

The bill for climate change is coming due

By Richard Schiffman
March 27, 2014

Americans have just endured one of the coldest winters in memory, so global warming may not be on their radar. But a new U.N. panel report has just refocused the public debate on a problem some scientists call the greatest threat facing the world.

Corporate tax reform: California points the way

By Bill Parks
February 10, 2014

The arcane, outdated and inefficient U.S. corporate tax code is costing our country jobs, factories, industries and tens of billions of dollars of badly-needed tax revenue each year.

Twitter use on the rise in #statecapitals

By Grover G. Norquist and Patrick Gleason
January 7, 2014

Twitter’s November initial public offering has been a success for the company’s founders and early investors. This reflects the market’s optimistic view of the company’s profit-making potential. For Twitter has transformed much of daily life — including how we get our news, communicate with others and participate in public discourse. (In fact, many media outlets now factor in what is trending on Twitter when covering news stories.)

Food fight: Vote on GMOs could alter U.S. food system

By Richard Schiffman
November 1, 2013

The citizens in Washington state are about to make a decision that could have a big impact across the nation.

Post-Partisan: Fixing our ideological divide

By Jonathan Soros
October 28, 2013

As Americans examine the astounding dysfunction of their government, gerrymandering is usually cited as the prime culprit. This narrative offers a compelling villain: venal politicians who draw district boundaries for partisan advantage or to protect their own incumbency.