The Great Debate

Alexander Litvinenko and Karl Marx’s stepchildren

By John Lloyd
January 27, 2016
Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, attends a demonstration in support of Boris Nemtsov, former deputy prime minister of Russia and prominent critic of Vladimir Putin, outside the Russian Embassy in London March 01, 2015. Nemstov was murdered two days ago as he walked across a bridge near the Kremlin in Moscow. REUTERS/Neil Hall (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTR4RN56

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. REUTERS/Neil Hall

China threatens sanctions against U.S. companies: Is this the future?

By Peter Harrell
January 26, 2016
Shipping containers are seen piled up at a port in Qingdao, Shandong province December 10, 2013. China's leaders began mapping out their economic and reform plans for 2014 behind closed doors on Tuesday, and would have drawn confidence from data showing the economy has sustained momentum from a mid-year pick-up into the final quarter. Picture taken December 10, 2013. REUTERS/China Daily (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA

Shipping containers piled up at a port in Qingdao, Shandong province December 10, 2013. REUTERS/China Daily

from Breakingviews:

Global smartphone brands face mass extinction

December 23, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Three ways China is finally taking its seat at the world’s table

By Anja Manuel
December 23, 2015
China's President Xi Jinping speaks during the opening ceremony of the 2nd annual World Internet Conference in Wuzhen town of Jiaxing, Zhejiang province, China, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Aly Song

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks at the opening of the 2nd annual World Internet Conference in Wuzhen town of Jiaxing, China, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Aly Song

Is the risk of nuclear war rising?

December 20, 2015
A surface-to-surface Agni V missile is launched from the Wheeler Island off the eastern Indian state of Odisha April 19, 2012. India test-fired the long range missile capable of reaching deep into China and Europe on Thursday, thrusting the emerging Asian power into an elite club of nations with intercontinental nuclear weapons capabilities. A scientist at the launch site said the launch was successful, minutes after television images showed the rocket with a range of more than 5,000 km (3,100 miles) blasting through clouds from the Wheeler Island off Odisha coast. REUTERS/Indian Defence Research and Development Organisation/DRDO/Handout (INDIA - Tags: MILITARY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - RTR30XD1

A surface-to-surface Agni V missile is launched from the Wheeler Island off the eastern Indian state of Odisha April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Indian Defence Research and Development Organisation/Handout

Why China, a geopolitical teenager, is finally growing up

By Peter Marino
December 16, 2015
A woman walks past corrugated iron fencing at a Chinese construction site in Kenya's capital Nairobi September 2, 2015. Picture taken September 2, 2015. To match CHINA-AFRICA/ REUTERS/Noor Khamis - RTX1WHJ6

A woman walks past corrugated iron fencing at a Chinese construction site in Kenya’s capital Nairobi September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Noor Khamis

The next battleground in the U.S.-China power struggle

By Peter Marino
December 4, 2015
Chinese President Xi Jinping (L), Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong (2nd L), Vietnamese Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc (2nd R) and Vietnamese Politburo member Dinh The Huynh raise a toast after witnessing a signing ceremony of a dozen of  bilateral agreements following their official talks at the VCP's Headquarters in Hanoi on November 5, 2015. REUTERS/Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool - RTX1UVMZ

Chinese President Xi Jinping (L), Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong (2nd L), Vietnamese Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc (2nd R) and Vietnamese Politburo member Dinh The Huynh raise a toast after witnessing a signing ceremony of a dozen of bilateral agreements following their official talks at the VCP’s Headquarters in Hanoi on November 5, 2015. REUTERS/Hoang Dinh Nam

Syria, Yemen, Libya — one factor unites these failed states, and it isn’t religion

By Jack Goldstone
November 30, 2015
Sheikh Ghazi Rashad Hrimis touches dried earth in the parched region of Raqqa province in eastern Syria, November 11, 2010. Lack of rain and mismanagement of the land and water resources have forced up to half of million people to flee the region in one of Syria's largest internal migrations since France and Britain carved the country out of the former Ottoman Empire in 1920.     REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri (SYRIA - Tags: AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT) - RTXUR9R

Sheikh Ghazi Rashad Hrimis touches dried earth in the parched region of Raqqa province in eastern Syria, November 11, 2010. REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri

Cybersecurity treaties may be nice, but it’s really every country for itself

By Robert Litwak and Meg King
November 11, 2015
U.S. Marine Sergeant Michael Kidd works on a computer at ECPI University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, February 7, 2012. Cyberspace was a hobby for Kidd before he joined the Marines in 2003, but he hopes to make it his new battlefield after suffering debilitating injuries in Iraq. At the naval air station in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the 26-year-old from Williamsburg is retraining to fight cyber threats, one of a number of wounded warriors transitioning to non-traditional combat fields in order to continue serving the United States' defense needs. Picture taken February 7, 2012.  REUTERS/Samantha Sais (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY EDUCATION) - RTR2XOOE

U.S. Marine Sergeant Michael Kidd works on a computer at ECPI University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, February 7, 2012. REUTERS/Samantha Sais

Why the U.S. may still have to go to war against Iran

By Bennett Ramberg
October 26, 2015
A general view of the Bushehr main nuclear reactor

The Bushehr main nuclear reactor, 1,200 km (746 miles) south of Tehran, August 21, 2010. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi