The Great Debate

Obama’s pivot to Asia faces a changing Chinese military

By William Johnson
April 7, 2015
Soldiers of Chinese People's Liberation Army see off a fleet before it sets out for Aden, Yemen from Zhoushan

Soldiers of Chinese People’s Liberation Army see off a fleet before it sets out for Aden, Yemen, from Zhoushan, Zhejiang province, April 3, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Options for the U.S. if Iran breaks a nuclear deal

By Bennett Ramberg
April 1, 2015

lbj & mac President Lyndon B. Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara in the White House in Washington, July, 27, 1965. LBJ Presidential Library/Yoichi Okamoto

The success of any nuclear framework agreement negotiated by Iran and the P5+1 (United States, Britain, Russia, Germany, France and China) this week ultimately will be determined not by the signing of a final accord in June but by Tehran’s fidelity to nonproliferation in the years and decades to come.

This drug, banned in Europe, Russia and China, may be in your lunch

By Wayne Pacelle
March 31, 2015
A dairy cow peers out from behind a fence in Chino, California

A cow peers out from behind a fence in a file photo. REUTERS/Alex Gallardo

If you eat meat in any country in the European Union, or even in China or Russia, you don’t have to worry about getting a dash of ractopamine with your pork or beef. All these nations ban the use of the growth-promoting drug.

Allies of convenience: China’s Xi Jinping’s just not that into Vladimir Putin

By William Johnson
March 24, 2015
Russia's President Putin walks past China's President Xi during APEC forum in Beijing

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (R) walks past China’s President Xi Jinping during the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, November 11, 2014. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon RTR4DN94

Islamic militant threat in China is real, not just propaganda

By William Johnson
March 18, 2015
Police wearing sashes hold placards during a ceremony to award those who the authorities say participated in "the crackdown of violence and terrorists activities" in Hotan

Police wearing sashes hold placards during a ceremony to award those who the authorities say participated in “the crackdown of violence and terrorists activities” in Hotan, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region August 3, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

Coming attractions: How long before most movies are translated from Chinese?

By Krishna Jayakar
March 13, 2015
A boy and his father pose for a photo next to a model of the Transformers character Bumblebee in central Beijing

A boy and his father pose for a photo next to a model of the Transformers character Bumblebee in front of Qianmen Gate in central Beijing, June 20, 2014. The replica is part of a promotional campaign ahead of the world premiere of the movie “Transformers: Age of Extinction” on June 27 around the globe. REUTERS/Jason Lee

U.S. and India: Two democracies can join to balance China’s rise

By Jon Huntsman Jr. and Bharath Gopalaswamy
January 25, 2015
U.S. President Obama and Indian Prime Minister Modi arrive for a photo opportunity ahead of their meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi

President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (R) arrive for a photo opportunity ahead of their meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, Jan. 25, 2015. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Stock markets set to take off as Europe, Asia abandon austerity

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 28, 2014

A pedestrian walks past an electronic board showing Japan's Nikkei average outside a brokerage in Tokyo

The Great Divergence is a term coined by economic historians to explain the sudden acceleration of growth and technology in Europe from the 16th century onward, while other civilizations such as China, India, Japan and Persia remained in their pre-modern state. This phrase has recently acquired a very different meaning, however,  more relevant to global economic and financial conditions today.

A misconception that could scuttle nuclear talks with Iran

By Jim Walsh and Aron Bernstein
November 24, 2014

EU envoy Ashton, Britain's Foreign Secretary Hammond and Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif sit at a table during talks in Vienna

As nuclear talks between Iran and the other members of the so-called P5+1 group are extended for another seven months, one issue is sure to remain a sticking point. The most important differences between all sides relates to the size of Iran’s uranium-enrichment program.

Despite the headlines, progress in Myanmar isn’t slipping away

By Jean-Marie Guehenno and Richard Horsey
November 19, 2014

U.S. President Barack Obama and opposition politician Aung San Suu Kyi hold a press conference after their meeting at her residence in Yangon

Is Myanmar’s reform effort going into reverse?

Not even close. Yet if international support for its political transition seriously weakens in the face of recent setbacks, the prophecies of Myanmar’s critics may be fulfilled. The international community needs to show staying power and accept that the road to reform is long.