The Great Debate

Why Jeb Bush’s super PAC plan is potentially illegal

By Fred Wertheimer
April 23, 2015
Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush speaks to the media after visiting Integra Biosciences during a campaign stop in Hudson, New Hampshire

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush speaks to the media during a campaign stop in Hudson, New Hampshire, March 13, 2015. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Soros: Big money can’t buy elections – influence is something else

By Jonathan Soros
February 10, 2015
An Occupy Wall Street demonstrator holds a sign as others gather during a national day of action "Occupy the Courts" in New York

A demonstrator holds a sign as others gather in Foley Square during a national day of action “Occupy the Courts” in New York, January 20, 2012. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Are U.S. rivals hacking the American electoral system? Why it’s impossible to know.

By Meredith McGehee
January 21, 2015
To match BREAKINGVIEWS-EMC/SECURITY

RSA SecureID electronic keys are pictured in a photo illustration taken in Singapore, June 8, 2011. REUTERS/Michael Caronna

Welcome back to the bad old days of American politics – only worse

By Richard White
January 21, 2015
holladay_koch_stanford

Ben Holladay, Courtesy of the Oregon Historical Society; Charles Koch, REUTERS/Courtesy Koch Industries; Leland Stanford, Wikipedia/Courtesy of Bancroft Library, University of California – Berkeley

Money speaks louder than words, but that doesn’t make it ‘speech’

By Deborah Hellman
January 20, 2015
A voter arrives to vote at the fire house due to storm damage at the regular polling station from Hurricane Sandy during the U.S. presidential election in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey

A voter arrives to vote at the fire house due to storm damage at the regular polling station from Hurricane Sandy during the presidential election in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Adam Hunger

When it comes to money in politics, the Supreme Court lives in a different reality

By Trevor Potter
January 16, 2015

The sun shines through cloud cover above the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, June 13, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Citizens United gives freedom of speech back to the people

By Bradley A. Smith
January 16, 2015
Voters fill in their ballots at a polling place located in Shoaf's Wagon Wheel during the U.S. midterm elections in Salisbury

Voters at a polling place located in Shoaf’s Wagon Wheel in Salisbury, North Carolina, November 4, 2014. REUTERS/Chris Keane

Tycoon dough: The ultimate electoral martial art

By Lawrence Norden and Daniel Weiner
January 16, 2015
supreme-court-perspective

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, May 20, 2009. REUTERS/Molly Riley

This is first article in the Reuters series on the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, handed down Jan. 21, 2010. After five years, is anything the same in U.S. elections? You can read other pieces in the series here.

Democracy is drowning in a sea of dark money

By Fred Wertheimer
January 16, 2015
Voters fill in their ballots as they vote in the U.S. midterm elections at a polling place in Westminster, Colorado

Voters fill in their ballots in the midterm elections at a polling place in Westminster, Colorado, November 4, 2014. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Can I invert myself and not pay taxes?

By Nicholas Wapshott
August 13, 2014

The Pfizer logo is seen at their world headquarters in New York

The hot tax-dodging business trend of the summer is inversion. A U.S. company buys a company in a country with a lower corporate tax rate, relocates its headquarters there and funnels its income through the new head office. As long as it does not repatriate profits, the self-exiled company can avoid paying U.S. corporate taxes.