Opinion

The Great Debate

Don’t let data protection turn into protectionism

We live in a global, digitally networked world. Cloud, mobile and in-memory technologies are its engines. Our new world has no boundaries; there is a huge potential for growth, employment and new business models. But it also comes with challenges for policy and industry.

In response to leaks about the U.S. National Security Agency’s widespread surveillance, there have been lots of understandable concerns globally. Unfortunately, some parties have suggested building fortresses around national data.

I believe that the new technologies and the free flow of data are essential to spurring innovation and expanding international trade. This is only possible if consumers and citizens trust the digital economy and use it extensively. We in industry must work with policymakers in all markets to create clear and transparent rules that both protect the legitimate rights of citizens, consumers and companies and promote cross-border data flows.

We urgently need an internal harmonization of security and privacy regulations in Europe, but these cannot lead to building data barriers around the continent.

On the contrary, Europe should work toward a global solution with other partners, starting with the United States. As both continue their transformation into digital economies, policymakers and industry representatives from both continents should come together and take an ambitious approach to creating joint standards and procedures that enable cross-border data flows under the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

from Commentaries:

Twitter backlash foretold

Technology market research firm Gartner Inc has published the 2009 "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies," its effort to chart out what's hot or not at the cutting edge of hi-tech jargon. It's just one of an annual phalanx of reports that handicap some 1,650 technologies or trends in 79 different categories for how likely the terms are to make it into mainstream corporate parlance.

Jackie Fenn, the report's lead analyst and author of the 2008 book "Mastering the Hype Cycle," delivers the main verdict:

Technologies at the Peak of Inflated Expectations during 2009 include cloud computing, e-books (such as from Amazon and Sony) and internet TV (for example, Hulu), while social software and microblogging sites (such as Twitter) have tipped over the peak and will soon experience disillusionment among corporate users.

Computer industry hopes lie in the clouds

ericauchard1– Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

No one can easily define it.

But the next phase of the computer revolution is busy being born out of the ashes of the current economic crisis. The new approach delivers computing power as a service over the Web, like an electric utility, instead of making customers buy computers they manage themselves.

It goes by the hazy term of “cloud computing.”

Forget your tidy distinctions between hardware and software, networking and storage, the Web and the desktop. Most disappear as they merge into the cloud.

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