The Great Debate

Will a few legal red cards affect the way FIFA plays?

By Stefan Szymanski
May 28, 2015
FIFA President Blatter arrives for opening ceremony of 65th FIFA Congress in Zurich

FIFA President Sepp Blatter arrives for the opening ceremony of the 65th FIFA Congress in Zurich, Switzerland, May 28, 2015. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Meet Senator Robert Menendez’s ‘friend with benefits’

By Richard White
April 2, 2015
Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) reacts as he exits the podium after speaking to the media during a news conference in Newark, New Jersey

Senator Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) leaving the podium after speaking to the media during a news conference in Newark, New Jersey, April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Lessons for U.S. police from an unexpected place – Northern Ireland

By Terry Golway
March 20, 2015
Police officers patrol a street in Ferguson

Police officers patrol a street in Ferguson, Missouri, August 11, 2014. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

The most important man in Europe you’ve never heard of

By John Lloyd
March 9, 2015
Guardia di Finanza troops stand before the Quirinale palace in Rome, April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Max Rossi

Guardia di Finanza troops stand before the Quirinale palace in Rome, April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Max Rossi

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: Welcome to the new, global Tangentopoli

February 26, 2015

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

One (difficult) step to curbing extremism

By Sarah Chayes
February 3, 2015
Smoke and flames rise over a hill near the Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

Smoke and flames rise over a hill near the Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

An Oscar Russia really doesn’t want to win

By David Gillespie
February 1, 2015
Aleksey Serebryakov as Kolya in Leviathan. REUTERS/Sony Pictures Classics

Aleksey Serebryakov as Kolya in Leviathan. REUTERS/Sony Pictures Classics

“Leviathan” is due to become one of the most celebrated Russian films in the West in decades, yet it may be banned in Russia. The film, which was the first from the country to win a Golden Globe since “War and Peace” in 1968, has also been nominated for an Oscar. But in Russia, the film has provoked a host of polarized reactions.

Wal-Mart’s bribery is sadly unsurprising

By Robert Boxwell
April 24, 2012

The recent New York Times revelation that Wal-Mart paid bribes to grease the skids of rapid expansion in Mexico is not shocking to anyone who has built a retail business in a developing country. It would be shocking if they hadn’t.

All of Washington lives in Newt’s swamp

By Jack Abramoff
November 21, 2011

By Jack Abramoff
The opinions expressed are his own.

Last week, Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich romanced the Tea Party activists, who demand that the corrupt swamp of Washington be drained. His intrepid spokesman, R.C. Hammond, had a more arduous task: convincing the world that the former Speaker was not swimming in that same swamp. As facts emerged revealing that Gingrich took almost $2 million in “consulting” fees from the beleaguered Freddie Mac, Hammond delivered proof that the Gingrich operation was master of the inside-the-Washington-beltway game. Spinning Gingrich’s perfidious (yet legal) trip through the infamous revolving door to post public service riches, Hammond posited that taking millions in consulting fees was actually a positive: since Newt now understood “why the system is broken,” he now knew “how it could be fixed.” In other words, now that he had participated in legal corruption, he was more qualified to be our President.

Dirty money and the war in Afghanistan

By Bernd Debusmann
March 19, 2010

In a long report on the war in Afghanistan for the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Foreign Relations last summer, one sentence stood out: “If we don’t get a handle on the money, we will lose this war to corruption.”