The Great Debate

Five overlooked global risks

September 15, 2009

Rafael Ramirez is James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University's Institute for Science, Innovation and Society. His latest book is "Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios" edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. — Rafael Ramírez is the James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University and author of “Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios” edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. Ramírez attended a session at the World Economic Forum’s gathering in Dalian, China, on managing global risks.

The end of the Davos consensus

By J Saft
January 30, 2009

– James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

Trust: the commodity in shortest supply

By Reuters Staff
January 28, 2009

Where do I put my money?
What do I read?
Who do I listen to?
Who saw it coming?
Who made money from it?
Who will make money from it?
Who can I trust?

Building a three-legged stool

By Reuters Staff
January 28, 2009

lawrence Lawrence Bloom is deputy chairman of Noble Cities and chairman of the World Economic Forum, Global Agenda Council on Urban Management. His views are his own –

From financial crisis to sustainable global economy

January 28, 2009

staff_jlash_121- Jonathan Lash is president of the World Resources Institute. The views expressed are his own -

Less social dialogue and more social change

By Reuters Staff
January 28, 2009

stern_official_5x5a- Andy Stern is the president of the Service Employees International Union. His views are his own -

A stimulating energy policy

January 28, 2009

rengle_alternate11

- Robert Engle is the Michael Armellino Professor of Finance at New York University Stern School of Business and a Nobel Laureate. His views are his own. -

Global crisis politics – A Davos debate with Nouriel Roubini and Ian Bremmer

By Andrew MacGregor Marshall
January 28, 2009

As governments grapple with the global crisis, politics has taken on central importance in determining the course of the world economy — and political risk is more significant than ever.

Turning the tables: Can you help Davos leaders?

By Reuters Staff
January 27, 2009

Klaus SchwabDavos is a well-rehearsed event and everyone knows the part they should play. Business and political leaders gather each year to tackle the major challenges of a global economy while the rest of the world, or those of its citizens who are interested, look on from afar. But this year, for obvious reasons, things are different. The notion of leadership has been coupled in the public mind with that of responsibility. The tone here is a little more humble and the attitude more open-minded. There’s a recognition that new thinking is required.  A suitable time, perhaps, to turn the tables on convention and have Davos delegates ask the questions they can’t answer and for global citizens to offer solutions.