The Great Debate

Zero U.S. debt wasn’t so great the first time around

July 29, 2011
By Chadwick Matlin
The opinions expressed are his own. 

At this rate, we’re going to have more debt-reduction proposals than we have trillions in debt. There was Simpson-Bowles, the Gang of Six (Pt. 1), Obama’s $4 trillion gambit, Coburn’s $9 trillion slash, Cut-Cap-and-Balance, and the Gang of Six (Pt. 2), Obama and Boehner’s near-deal, and as of this week Reid and Boehner’s dueling plans. But even the most austere of these proposals would have left us more than $5 trillion in debt, and the one likely to pass—if one passes, that is—will likely still leave us with more than $10 trillion of obligations. Somewhere, Andrew Jackson is shaking his skeletal head, pissed that a bunch of profligate Americans have soiled his legacy.

from Reuters Money:

Is the American Dream dead?

June 23, 2011

The American Dream lures people from all over the world, and it’s because of this possibility: If you come here and work hard, your kids will have a better life than you.

Five ways to correct the Greek debt crisis

May 3, 2011

By Mohamed El-Erian
This piece is the English version of the one that appeared in Handelsblatt. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Summit Notebook:

Does Germany need Europe?

December 6, 2010

Jim O'Neill, the new Goldman Sachs Asset Management chairman who is famous for coining the term BRICs for the world's new emerging economic giants, reckons he knows why Germany might not be rushing to bail out all the euro zone debt that is under pressure. Europe is not as important to Berlin as it was.

Deleveraging a process, not an event

September 21, 2010

It may be about as fun as having a tooth pulled, but cutting very high levels of debt in an economy is more of a process than a short, sharp event.

Fed can’t fix broken economy, politics

August 12, 2010

The Federal Reserve’s decision to move to a kind of quantitative neutrality is a tacit admission that it, or rather that the United States, is in a political bind that makes a bold response to a deteriorating economy difficult.

For assets, demographics may be destiny

August 11, 2010

Right about now a massive demographic shift is getting under way which will put substantial downward pressure on house and stock prices, perhaps suppressing global asset prices by one percent a year.

from The Great Debate UK:

EU stress tests: for banks or governments?

July 19, 2010

- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.-

from The Great Debate UK:

A history lesson for lenders

June 9, 2010

GREECE

-Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.-