The Great Debate

Why the 2016 Republican nominee is likely to be chosen by the blue states

By Bill Schneider
February 17, 2015
Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush addresses delegates during the final session of the Republican National Convention in Tampa

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush addresses delegates at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012 REUTERS/Mike Segar

The war between Congress and the White House

By Bill Schneider
February 6, 2015
U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner watches as U.S. President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of Congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington

House Speaker John Boehner watches as President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, January 13, 2015. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Israel’s dangerous new game playing out in Washington’s corridors of power

By Bill Schneider
January 27, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens as President Barack Obama (R) speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, October 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Republicans talk about inequality. But how serious are they?

By Bill Schneider
January 20, 2015

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell stand at a ceremony to posthumously present the Congressional Gold Medal to Raoul Wallenberg in Washington

President Barack Obama is laying down his marker Tuesday with his State of the Union Address. He told a closed-door meeting of Senate Democrats last week, “I’m not going to spend the next two years on defense. I’m going to play offense.”

What does it take to win the Democratic nomination in 2016?

By Bill Schneider
December 29, 2014

ydbElizabeth Warren, candidate for the U.S. Senate in Massachusetts, addresses the second session of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte

Get out your pitchforks, Democrats! A showdown over populism is coming.

The core of the problem is the decline of Democratic support among white working-class voters.  White voters without a college degree made up 36 percent of the midterm electorate this year. They voted nearly 2-to-1 Republican.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why political gridlock works for the U.S. economy, but not for Japan or EU

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 7, 2014

U.S. President Obama hosts a luncheon for bi-partisan Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House in Washington

Is gridlocked government a betrayal of democracy? Or does it allow citizens to get on with their lives and businesses, unencumbered by meddlesome politicians?

Every political landslide carries the seeds of its own destruction

By Bill Schneider
November 7, 2014

U.S. Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell holds a news conference after he was re-elected to a sixth term to the U.S. Senate at the University of Louisville in Louisville

You can’t govern the United States from Capitol Hill. Republicans learned that after they took over Congress in 1994. House Speaker Newt Gingrich claimed a mandate to enforce his “Contract with America.”  What he had was a mandate to make deals with President Bill Clinton.

A quick guide to the smartest midterm election analysis

By Allison Silver
November 5, 2014

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell addresses supporters with his wife Elaine Chao at his midterm election night rally in Louisville

Early Election Night, there was a lot of parsing of the term “wave election.” It sure quacks like one. The Washington Post had no trouble declaring a GOP wave well before midnight Tuesday. (The piece posted at 11:33 p.m., but pulls together too many stats to have been written on the spot.)

Political parties swap roles: Can social issues help Democrats?

By Bill Schneider
November 3, 2014

U.S. Senator Hagan speaks with the media after addressing a group of campaign volunteers in Cornelius

The 2014 campaign marks a departure: It is the first campaign in 50 years in which Democrats are relying on social issues, while economic issues seem to be helping Republicans.

Whack-a-mole: A lesson in the unexpected consequences of ‘cleaning up’ politics

By Richard White
November 3, 2014

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I may be the one person who listens to the election news and thinks about Benjamin Harrison. You don’t remember him? President of the United States from 1888-1892? The scion of a political dynasty that yielded enough failed presidencies to make the Harrisons the Bushes of the 19th century? So why do I think of Harrison? Because this is an election year that centers on money.