The Great Debate

High unemployment and the education deficit

By Reuters Staff
July 28, 2010

graduation photo USE THISThe following is a guest post by Bruce Yandle, distinguished adjunct professor of economics with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and dean emeritus of the College of Business & Behavioral Science at Clemson University. The opinions expressed here are his own.

from MacroScope:

What are the risks to growth?

July 19, 2010

Mike Dicks, chief economist and blogger at Barclays Wealth, has identified what he sees as the three biggest problems facing the global economy, and conveniently found that they are linked with three separate regions.

from The Great Debate UK:

EU stress tests: for banks or governments?

July 19, 2010

- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Inflation or Deflation, why settle for just one?

By J Saft
July 1, 2010

If you are trying to decide whether to fret about inflation or deflation, don’t bother: you may just get both.

from The Great Debate UK:

Pranab Bardhan on the economic rise of China and India

May 31, 2010

In its May economic outlook, the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development projected upward growth outlooks for BRIC countries Brazil, Russia, India and China -- the world's four largest emerging economies.

In praise of Latin American immigrants

By Bernd Debusmann
April 30, 2010

The United States owes Latin American immigrants a debt of gratitude. And Latin American immigrants owe a debt of gratitude to lawmakers in Arizona. How so?

Bank lending and profits; a costly divergence

April 13, 2010

Don’t count on the profitability of the financial services sector as a leading indicator of anything. Well, anything other than financial services compensation.

Deflation pressure not just from housing

By J Saft
April 8, 2010

It will take more than a recovery in housing to reignite inflation in the U.S. economy, a state of play that argues for the continued threat of deflation and a Federal Reserve that is pinned to the mat, unable, even if willing, to raise interest rates.

The Age of Frugality takes a holiday

By J Saft
April 1, 2010

That whole Age of Frugality thing didn’t last long, did it?

U.S. real personal consumption grew in February at a respectable 0.3 percent clip, the fifth straight such monthly rise, a fact widely greeted as news that the recovery is on course. The fly in this tasty soup, however, is income, which in real terms didn’t increase at all, not even by one tenth of a percent.