The Great Debate

Fed redux: Making policy behind the curve

January 29, 2010

– John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. –

There’s no way to hedge politics

January 26, 2010

Ben Bernanke in peril and the Volcker crackdown on proprietary trading by banks show two truths of the current dispensation: there is no effective hedge against politics and the reflation trade rests on fragile foundations.

Fed stuck doing the heavy lifting

January 12, 2010

-James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own-
With employment weak and consumer credit weaker, look for extended official measures to support the U.S. economy.

Icelandic, Greek sagas show sovereign risks

January 7, 2010

– James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. –

Bernanke’s fearful asymmetry

January 5, 2010

saft2.jpg – James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own —

Welcome to the Teenies, sorry about those returns

December 29, 2009

saft2.jpg
-James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own-

As we say goodbye to a decade so abysmal it never even earned a nickname, it is time to take bets on how the coming 10 years will shape up in economics and financial markets.

from The Great Debate UK:

A year of austerity looms in 2010

December 23, 2009

david-kuo_motley-foolthumbnail-David Kuo is director at the Motley Fool. The opinions expressed are his own.-

If you thought 2009 was as bad as things will get, then think again: 2010 could be worse. It is likely to be a year of enforced austerity with both the government and households making obligatory cuts to their budgets.

from MacroScope:

Crisis? What Crisis?

November 18, 2009

The title of this post is taken from two sources. One was a headline in British tabloid, The Sun, in January 1979, when then-prime minister James Callaghan denied that strike-torn Britain was in chaos. The second was the title of a 1975 album by prog rock band Supertramp that famously showed someone sunbathing amidst the grey awfulness of the declining industrial landscape.

Can recovery and credit crunch coexist?

By J Saft
November 12, 2009

jamessaft1.jpg(James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

New studies from the Federal Reserve and European Central Bank show that, whatever else, a recovery in the economy is not being supported by a resumption in bank lending, raising concerns about how exactly growth will become self-sustaining when official stimulus ebbs.

from The Great Debate UK:

When firms “Too Big to Fail” fall

November 5, 2009

Amid the turmoil of the 2008 financial crisis a myriad of events unfolded that the general public knew nothing about, writes New York Times reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin in a new book titled "Too Big to Fail."