The Great Debate

Reaching for a deal on Crimea

By Samuel Charap and Keith Darden
March 19, 2014

There is a disturbing air of inevitability in Western capitals surrounding Russia’s annexation of Crimea. A growing consensus views this scenario as a rough analogy to  Moscow’s recognition of Georgia’s breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia after the 2008 war — perhaps more severe, but still manageable.

from Lawrence Summers:

Ukraine: Don’t repeat past mistakes

By Lawrence Summers
March 10, 2014

The events in Ukraine have now made effective external support for successful economic and political reform there even more crucial. The world community is rising to the occasion, with concrete indications of aid coming not just from the International Monetary Fund and other international financial institutions but also the United States, the European Union and the G20.

Assessing corporate risk in Ukraine

By Lucy P. Marcus
March 5, 2014

As the crisis in Ukraine escalates, boardrooms and senior management teams worldwide are now likely talking about the problems of doing business in conflict zones. These regions test the boundaries of risk tolerance.

Ukraine: Obama must escape the ‘Cold War syndrome’

By Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman
February 21, 2014

When it comes to the mounting crisis in Ukraine, President Barack Obama is stuck playing an old role. Since World War Two, U.S. presidents have steadfastly held to the same course when it comes to Russia.

Ukraine after the Maidan

By William E. Pomeranz
February 19, 2014

Writing the first draft of history is always difficult, especially when the opening act curtain has not officially fallen. Yet developments in Ukraine have now reached a critical turning point, with certain consequences likely to follow.

Moscow fiddles, while Kiev burns

By William E. Pomeranz
January 31, 2014

Timing is everything in politics, and this adage could not be truer for the whirlwind now enveloping Russia and Ukraine. Both countries are in the headlines — Russia for the coming $50 billion Winter Olympics extravaganza, and Ukraine for an economic and political collapse that has left the country on the cusp of revolution.

Ukraine’s Protests: Not (yet) a revolution

By Matthew Rojansky
December 12, 2013

In the three weeks since Ukraine formally suspended talks aimed at signing an Association Agreement with the European Union, two important facts have become clear.

A new look at climate change

By Mike Honda and Michael Shank
December 9, 2013

The annual United Nations climate change talks, which concluded last month in Warsaw, unfortunately found little common ground on carbon. The talks broke down over the world’s richest nations’ inability to agree with the poorest on how to address the financial costs of global climate change.

Obama: Building trade to build growth

By Edward Alden
December 5, 2013

The Obama administration has quietly embraced the most ambitious agenda on trade and investment liberalization in the past two decades.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

No, austerity did not work

By Nicholas Wapshott
November 7, 2013

There have been a lot of sighs of relief in Europe lately, where countries like Britain and Spain, long in recession, have finally started to grow. Not by much, nor for long. But such is the political imperative to suggest that all the misery of fiscally tight economic policies was worth the pain that there are tentative claims the worst is now over and, ipso facto, austerity worked.