The Great Debate

Yes, the feds can hack your iPhone. No, it isn’t easy.

February 18, 2016
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple event in San Francisco, California March 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES  - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)

Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook speaks during an Apple event in San Francisco, California, March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

Why it’s so hard to root out violent extremists before they strike

February 7, 2016
FBI and police investigator are seen around a vehicle in which two suspects were shot following a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California December 3, 2015. Authorities on Thursday were working to determine why Syed Rizwan Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, who had a 6-month-old daughter together, opened fire at a holiday party of his co-workers in Southern California, killing 14 people and wounding 17 in an attack that appeared to have been planned.   REUTERS/Mike Blake

FBI and police investigators surround a vehicle in which two suspects were shot following a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, December 3, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Blake

US wants to hack your phone because it doesn’t have real spies it needs

February 23, 2015

A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in Paris

As Google’s Android smartphone operating system was coming under attack in fall 2012 from malware with the colorful names of “Loozfon” and “FinFisher,” the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center issued an alert to help defend against the threat. “Depending on the type of phone,” the FBI said, “the operating system may have encryption available. This can be used to protect the user’s personal data.”

Militants will always get through for one reason: Money

February 22, 2015
Gunmen gesture as they return to their car after the attack outside the offices of French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo

French authorities had removed Said Kouachi and his brother Cherif, the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris (seen at rear), from the intelligence watch list. Still from video in Paris, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Reuters TV

What does an electronic open-air drug market have to do with bringing down dictators? Everything.

January 26, 2015
An illustration picture shows projection of binary code on man holding aptop computer in Warsaw

Illustration picture shows binary code on a man holding a laptop computer, June 24, 2013. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel

The capture of Khatallah: How things went down in Libya

June 20, 2014

Navy SEAL photo downloads

When Ahmed Abu Khatallah, accused of leading the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi was seized by U.S. special forces in Libya after midnight Monday, it raised a number of questions. Not the least being why it took 21 months to capture him.

Terrorism, Putin and the Cold War legacy

May 14, 2013

Russian President Vladimir Putin, April 11, 2013 REUTERS/Aleksey Nikolskyi/RIA Novosti/Pool

The FBI-Russia connection

May 9, 2013

Suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing April 15 in handout photo released on the FBI website, April 18, 2013. REUTERS/FBI/Handout

What Boston bombers manhunt revealed about the FBI

April 23, 2013

In the end, it was a high-tech gadget that allowed the FBI to identify the first Boston bomber in the video, the man agents called “Black Hat.”