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from Commentaries:

CFTC prepares to recant speculators’ influence

johnkempcrop-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

Like Archbishop Thomas Cranmer before he was burned at the stake for heresy, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) seems about to make a dramatic recantation.

Later today, the Commission will hold the first of three public hearings to discuss whether to impose tougher position limits in energy markets and restrict the availability of hedging exemptions. But it is already preparing to release a report that will accuse speculators of playing a significant role in last year's oil price spike, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

While it might seem a minor shift in emphasis, it is a radical reversal of the Commission's previously stated view that there was "no evidence" that investment flows had a material impact on prices. Commission staff have doggedly maintained that physical supply and demand factors could explain all the observed volatility in oil and other commodity prices over the past two years.

The position was stated most forcefully by CFTC Chief Economist Jeffrey Harris in testimony to the House of Representatives' Agriculture Committee in May 2008 (http://www.cftc.gov/stellent/groups/public/@newsroom/documents/speechandtestimony/harris-fenton051508.pdf).

It was repeated in September 2008 in the CFTC's "Staff Report on Swap Dealers and Index Traders" and again this year in a joint report with the United Kingdom's Financial Services Authority (FSA) on commodity regulation for the International Organisation of Securities Organisations (IOSCO).

Credit control will be much more intrusive in future

John Kemp Great Debate– John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own –

The international system of bank regulation, epitomised by the Basle II process and the light-touch principles-based regulation of Britain’s Financial Services Authority (FSA) has comprehensively failed.

In too many instances, light-touch principles-based regulation with an emphasis on banks’ internal risk controls turned out to be no effective regulation at all.

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