Opinion

The Great Debate

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: GE should put itself up for sale

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

General Electric should sell itself. If that sounds like an April Fools’ Day joke, think again. It’s a real proposal on the ballot at the industrial group’s annual meeting. Setting aside the absence of any obvious buyer for the $260 billion company, the proposition illustrates the kind of shareholder democracy gone wild that many boards, and even some regulators, would like to squelch. They have half a point.

The proposal is one of about six that investors put forward and will be up for a vote at GE’s April 23 annual meeting in Chicago. Not all are quite so extreme. One calls for senior executives to hold options for life. Another would end stock awards and bonuses. Naturally, management is opposed to each of them.

But stockholder Robert Fredrich’s proposal that GE “hire an investment bank to explore the sale of the company” is the most financially illogical. For starters, there is no buyer capable of taking such a big gulp, unless Apple, Google or Exxon Mobil suddenly decides to change strategic course.

Moreover, Fredrich offers no evidence for his view that a sale would “release significantly more value.” A breakup of the finance-engines-turbines-refrigerators conglomerate might be worth considering, but not when the market cap of the company is greater than the sum of its parts, as GE contends is the case today.

Collaboration is the key to economic growth

aron-cramer– Aron Cramer is president and CEO of BSR, a global business network and consultancy focused on sustainability. The views expressed are his own. —

As the World Economic Forum’s “Summer Davos” meeting in Dalian, China, gets underway, it is a bit chilling to think back to how the financial crisis was unfolding in real time during last year’s event.

As the 1,000 leaders gathering for this year’s event spend three days debating how to restore economic growth and social stability, the need to focus on a long-term transition to a more sustainable economy is clearer than ever.

from Rolfe Winkler:

Buffett’s Betrayal

When I was 14, Warren Buffett wrote me a letter.

It was a response to one I'd sent him, pitching an investment idea.  For a kid interested in learning stocks, Buffett was a great role model.  His investing style -- diligent security analysis, finding competent management, patience -- was immediately appealing.

Buffett was kind enough to respond to my letter, thanking me for it and inviting me to his company's annual meeting.  I was hooked.  Today, Buffett remains famous for investing The Right Way.  He even has a television cartoon in the works, which will groom the next generation of acolytes.

But it turns out much of the story is fiction.  A good chunk of his fortune is dependent on taxpayer largess. Were it not for government bailouts, for which Buffett lobbied hard, many of his company's stock holdings would have been wiped out.

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