The Great Debate

from Jack Shafer:

The truth is, you’ve never had the ‘right to be forgotten’

By Jack Shafer
July 15, 2014

An illustration picture shows a Google logo with two one Euro coins

A recent ruling by Europe's top court has given its people a "right to be forgotten." Google and other search engines must now delete "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant, or excessive" information from search queries when a European individual requests it, even when the info is true. This isn't a classic case of censorship: the "offending" pages produced by newspapers and other websites will go untouched. Google and the other search engines just won't be allowed to link to them.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: ITT’s ghost hangs over Silicon Valley

May 20, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Theodore Roosevelt on net neutrality

By Michael Wolraich
May 4, 2014

tr & crowd

“Above all else,” President Theodore Roosevelt admonished Congress in 1905, “we must strive to keep the highways of commerce open to all on equal terms.”

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: GE should put itself up for sale

April 1, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Jack Shafer:

Who’s afraid of Comcast?

By Jack Shafer
February 19, 2014

Set aside for a moment everything you've read about the $45 billion bid Comcast made for Time Warner Cable last week. Blank from your mind Paul Krugman's prediction that the deal will result in a Comcast monopoly. Pretend you didn't read the New York Times piece about the acquisition presaging further consolidation in the cable market, with Charter Communications picking off Cox Communications. Thump yourself with a neuralyzer, if you can, and remove from your memory the protest against the transaction by Michael Copps, former Federal Communications Commission commissioner.

France says ‘Non’ to the digital age

By Peter Gumbel
January 10, 2014

France has kicked off 2014 with an array of skirmishes against Amazon, Google and other U.S. Internet companies, in what is shaping up as a classic battle between comfortable Gallic tradition and disruptive modernity.

Inside the Apple and Google smartphone war

By Fred Vogelstein
November 15, 2013

This is an excerpt from DOGFIGHT: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution by Fred Vogelstein, published in October 2013 by Sarah Crichton Books, an imprint of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC.

Social media life: What privacy?

By Anne Taylor Fleming
March 18, 2013

It was almost quaint: Google’s recent apology for privacy violations. Granted, it came in the face of a lawsuit where the company got its hand slapped for “data-scooping,” a wonderful phrase that could be the slogan of our current lives. Google was found to have crossed the line with its Street View Project, where in addition to photographing houses and buildings along the world’s streets and avenues, the Googilians scooped up all manner of personal information from zillions of unencrypted wireless networks.

from MediaFile:

Instagram’s Facebook filter

May 11, 2012

The startup had millions of users, but, from the beginning, just one customer.

The predominant way of interpreting Facebook’s billion-dollar purchase of Instagram, in light of the social-networking giant's forthcoming IPO, is that Mark Zuckerberg had to pick up the photo-sharing app to boost his company’s mobile engagement. That would allow him to guard the mobile flank against incursions from Google, Twitter, and whatever other social-media tools might next arise.

from Paul Smalera:

The piracy of online privacy

February 10, 2012

Online privacy doesn’t exist. It was lost years ago. And not only was it taken, we’ve all already gotten used to it. Loss of privacy is a fundamental tradeoff at the very core of social networking. Our privacy has been taken in service of the social tools we so crave and suddenly cannot live without. If not for the piracy of privacy, Facebook wouldn’t exist. Nor would Twitter. Nor even would Gmail, Foursquare, Groupon, Zynga, etc.