The Great Debate

Ireland could use a little audacity of hope

By Marian Harkin
May 24, 2011

By Marian Harkin

The opinions expressed are her own.

Barack Obama’s infectious hope will help replenish the spirits of the beleaguered Irish people as we strive to emerge from recession, but more significantly his invoking our small nation’s educational and entrepreneurial talents help to show us the way forward.

from James Saft:

Icelandic mulishness wins the day

December 9, 2010

Iceland's remarkable return to growth shows once again that in this crisis the best policy is often the one that will make international partners most angry.

from James Saft:

Pension savers get the boot

November 30, 2010

From Dublin to Paris to Budapest to inside those brown UPS trucks delivering holiday packages, it has been a tough few weeks for savers and retirees.

from MacroScope:

Europe’s over-achievers and their fall from grace

November 24, 2010

Ireland's fall from grace has been rapid and far worse than that of its counterparts, even Greece. But life in the euro zone has still been one of profound growth, as it has for most of the other peripheral economies.

It’s time for a wider European policy debate

By Mohamed El-Erian
November 18, 2010

AUSTRALIA/By Mohamed El-Erian
The opinions expressed are the author’s own.

It is safe to say that there is broad agreement on what is most desirable for solving the Irish crisis — namely a mix of domestic policies and external financing finely calibrated to enable the country to grow strongly, create jobs, stabilize the banks, and overcome large and mounting indebtedness.

Irish plight about more than austerity

By J Saft
September 10, 2010

Ireland and its economic unraveling is not simply a test case of the stimulus versus austerity dispute, it is an illustration of the limits and pitfalls of the very popular strategy of keeping the banks ticking over, hiding under a desk and hoping for a strong recovery.

from MacroScope:

Political economy and the euro

February 8, 2010

The reality of  'political economy'  is something that irritates many economists -- the "purists", if you like. The political element is impossible to model;  it often flies in the face of  textbook economics;  and democratic decision-making and backroom horse trading can be notoriously difficult to predict and painfully slow.  And political economy is all pervasive in 2010 -- Barack Obama's proposals to rein in the banks is rooted in public outrage; reading China's monetary and currency policies is like Kremlinology; capital curbs being introduced in Brazil and elsewhere aim to prevent market overshoot; and British budgetary policies are becoming the political football ahead of this spring's UK election. The list is long, the outcomes uncertain, the market risk high.

from The Great Debate UK:

Thomson Reuters Newsmaker: Ireland and the Lisbon Treaty

By Reuters Staff
September 7, 2009

Political leaders gathered in Dublin to debate both sides of the controversial Lisbon Treaty and the implications it could have on the future of Europe.