Opinion

The Great Debate

Scotland can expect one heckuva hangover after independence vote – yes or no

RTR44CO3.jpg

Scotland will soon be suffering from a monumental hangover. There will be a lot of hurt heads, a lot of tears and, without a doubt, an immense amount of anger that will last who knows how long — weeks, months, maybe even years — if Alex Salmond’s dream of independence comes true.

The Sept. 18 referendum on independence is quite unlike any other United Kingdom election I have witnessed. It is much more visceral, with so many complicated currents swirling beneath one simple question: Is Scotland in Britain or out of it? There are a lot of people going with their gut instinct, and you sense that if the outcome goes against them, the simmering rage will finally bubble over.

Rioting in the streets? Perhaps.

The problem for the Unionists is that nothing they can say will ever match that magic potion being served up by the Scottish Nationalists — that beautiful policy that can be summed up in one sweet word: “change.” 

If you’re not happy with things at the moment — with the UK’s current Conservative government; with the state of the National Health Service; with the perceived snootiness of the English — then simply vote for change.

It’s a message that has been promised by Tony Blair, by Barack Obama and by almost every Western leader for more than a century.

from The Great Debate UK:

Cameron tasked with changing Brits’ expectations

-- Mark Kobayashi-Hillary is the author of several books, including ‘Who Moved my Job?’ and ‘Global Services: Moving to a Level Playing Field’. The opinions expressed are his own --

After thirteen years, it’s all over. The New Labour project is dead. Or is it? Tony Blair brought British politics to the centre-ground and ensured that a single party could support free-market economic policies as well as social justice.

And that’s what most people want today, a government that can help the citizen without hindering the economy through the dogma of dated ideology. The old notion of socialists waging war on small-government-right-wingers feels somehow quaint. Clearly Tony Blair knew that David Cameron would be his successor in the New Labour project, but nobody told Gordon Brown.

from The Great Debate UK:

Labour hits the right nuclear button

REUTERS-- Neil Collins is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Here's a novelty -- an awkward process that this British government has actually got right. Labour has played a fine game of grandmother's footsteps in its realization of the inevitability of new nuclear power stations, and this week has clinched the sale of two sites for them.

The auction process, pioneered by Labour with the sale of radio spectrum for mobile phones, has once again raised much more than most observers expected.

Germany's RWE and Eon are now the proud owners of land at Wylfa (on Anglesey, an island off a remote corner of Wales) and Oldbury (Gloucester, England).

  •