U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Chairman Mary Schapiro answers a question at the Reuters Future Face of Finance Summit in Washington March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque Two women are fending off a vicious man-handling of investor protection.

As Congress pettily wrangles over the debt limit and the next budget, Mary Schapiro and Elizabeth Warren are fighting to protect you against the ravages of Wall Street.

Wall Street and its Republican allies would like to make the Dodd-Frank financial reforms disappear. The money trust has been pouring millions into lobbying to eviscerate the budget of the Securities and Exchange Commission and blocking the formation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Mary Schapiro, who chairs the SEC, said she can't kick start the myriad pro-investor rules of Dodd-Frank without adequate funding. Republicans, lead by Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, want to "starve the beast" in their fiscal year 2012 proposal.

Ryan's new budget proposal wants to cut off the SEC budget at its knees by giving the SEC $112 million for fiscal year Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Advisor Elizabeth Warren listens to a question at the Reuters Future Face of Finance Summit in Washington March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque 2012. That effectively freezes the top securities regulator's funding at 2008 levels. The current budget deal gives the agency a slight increase in funding.

Remember what happened to Wall Street in 2008? The Obama Administration wants $308 million for the SEC to prevent another year like that from happening. The money trust has deliberate amnesia.