The Great Debate

from Breakingviews:

AT&T puts shareholders on hold for DirecTV

May 19, 2014

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Jack Shafer:

It’s an ad, ad, ad, ad world

By Jack Shafer
March 13, 2014

The last place you'd expect to discover a map to navigate the future of the content-advertising landscape would be a book about the golden age of radio. But damn it all to hell, there it is on the concluding 12 pages of Cynthia B. Meyers' new book, A Word From Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio.

Does bad publicity kill merger plans — and should it?

September 30, 2013

Last week Fairfax Financial Holdings chief executive officer Prem Watsa insisted that he would not walk away from a BlackBerry deal. “We’ve never renegotiated,” he said. “Over 28 years our reputation is stellar on that front. We just don’t do that.” Watsa’s statement followed a 6 percent loss in share price. The firm was in a tough spot. Reporters covered the market’s lack of enthusiasm and the deal looked like it could be a goner.

D.C. scandals: They had Nixon ‘to kick around’

By Conrad Black
July 3, 2013

President Richard Nixon at a White House press conference during the Watergate scandal. REUTERS/Courtesy Nixon Library

from MediaFile:

Content everywhere? More like content nowhere

March 2, 2012

Will Big Media and Big Tech companies ever stop punishing their biggest fans?

Like many people, I woke up yesterday and reached for my iPad for my morning hit of news, entertainment and information, so I could start my day. (And like many, I’m embarrassed to admit it.) Padding to the front door to get a newspaper still sounds more respectable, but my iPad gives me a far more current, rich and satisfying media experience than a still-warm printed Times could ever produce.

from Paul Smalera:

What real Internet censorship looks like

February 27, 2012

Lately Internet users in the U.S. have been worried about censorship, copyright legalities and data privacy. Between Twitter’s new censorship policy, the global protests over SOPA/PIPA and ACTA and the outrage over Apple’s iOS allowing apps like Path to access the address book without prior approval, these fears have certainly seemed warranted. But we should also remember that Internet users around the world face far more insidious limitations and intrusions on their Internet usage -- practices, in fact, that would horrify the average American.

from Paul Smalera:

Twitter’s censorship is a gray box of shame, but not for Twitter

January 29, 2012

Twitter’s announcement this week that it was going to enable country-specific censorship of posts is arousing fury around the Internet. Commentators, activists, protesters and netizens have said it’s “very bad news” and claim to be “#outraged”. Bianca Jagger, for one, asked how to go about boycotting Twitter, on Twitter, according to the New York Times. (Step one might be... well, never mind.) The critics have settled on #TwitterBlackout: all day on Saturday the 28th, they promised to not tweet, as a show of protest and solidarity with those who might be censored.

Supporting the past, ignoring the future

By Rasmus Kleis Nielsen
December 22, 2011

By Rasmus Kleis Nielsen
The opinions expressed are his own.


Western media industries are going through a rapid and often painful transformation today with the rise of the Internet and mobile platforms, the erosion of the largest free-to-air broadcast audiences, and the decline of paid print newspaper circulation.

The Fox in the Tea Party

By Theda Skocpol
December 21, 2011

By Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson

The views expressed are their own.


Many observers of the role of U.S. media in politics as of the early twenty­-first century are alarmed that partisanship has crept in. This rarely bothers very conservative pundits, of course, because (even if they constantly com­plain about “liberal media bias”) they know that the elephants in the room are on their side. Liberals and self-styled nonpartisan critics engage in constant tut-tutting about the horrors of partisan media. They forget that American democracy was born and flourished through the nineteenth cen­tury in an environment where major newspapers, the mass media of the day, were all closely aligned with political parties. “Objective news” was not to be found; nineteenth-century editors and reporters alike presented highly se­lective versions of the facts, often in luridly emotional ways.

from The Great Debate UK:

Women leaders: High peaks, low gullies

March 5, 2010

glenda_stone- Glenda Stone is an Australian businesswomen in the UK, CEO of Aurora and a commentator on economic gender issues. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–.-