The Great Debate

How home prices helped kill the first tech boom

By Ryan Avent
September 13, 2011
By Ryan Avent
The opinions expressed are his own. 

The late 1990s was a wild time in Silicon Valley. The NASDAQ was soaring, and seemingly anyone could start a company, stick a .com at the end of its name, put together an IPO and retire a millionaire. The great boom ultimately took on a speculative character that led to wasted investments and the collapse of many poorly-grounded operations. But it was rooted in a surge of not-unrealistic optimism about the potential of the internet to change the world of business.

from Reuters Money:

Retirement investors suffer as economy catches up to Wall Street

August 9, 2011

Retirement investors have struggled with a Jekyll and Hyde economy these past two years, where Dr. Jekyll lives very well on Wall Street while Mr. Hyde runs roughshod over a terrified Main Street.

from Commentaries:

Goldman’s real estate gambit

July 28, 2009

Matthew Goldstein.jpgIs history repeating itself at Goldman Sachs?

In late 2006, Goldman shrewdly began backing away from the residential mortgage market. With little fanfare, the firm began aggressively hedging its exposure to home loans, in particular mortgages to borrowers with shaky credit histories.

from Commentaries:

Goldman still puzzles

June 25, 2009

Matthew GoldsteinInvesting in Goldman Sachs still requires a leap of faith in the investment firm's ability to out-trade, out-wit and out-muscle everyone else on Wall Street.

Fishing for the housing bottom in San Diego

By J Saft
March 30, 2009

– James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –
jimsaftcolumn6
When prophetic long time bears turn a bit cuddly, it is usually best to take notice.  A real estate maven who rejoices in the “nom-de-blog” of Professor Piggington has now, after five years of correctly shouting bubble, labelled San Diego housing prices “reasonable” based on the latest available housing data.