The Great Debate

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: Good news for guns is bad for gunmakers

November 18, 2014

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Ushering Eric Cantor to revolving door

August 7, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

FCC needs thick skin to weather its moment in sun

May 14, 2014

By Daniel Indiviglio and Robert Cyran
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: GE should put itself up for sale

April 1, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Don’t belittle Congress’s attempts to enhance mineral production

By Colin T. Hayes
January 3, 2014

As someone deeply familiar with Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s leadership on the “Critical Minerals Policy Act,” John Kemp’s recent Reuters column criticizing the bill struck me as a cynically misguided reaction to her important work. Sen. Murkowski introduced the legislation in order to, as she put it, “keep the United States competitive and begin the process of modernizing our federal mineral policies.” This is a laudable goal and an important process, particularly as our foreign reliance increases for materials needed to build semiconductors, skyscrapers, and everything in between.

New Zealand’s bold experiment with regulating recreational drugs

By Maia Szalavitz
October 8, 2013

It’s been nearly a century since the United States began its experiment in prohibiting recreational drugs besides alcohol, caffeine and tobacco — and virtually no one sees the trillion dollar policy as a success. A recent study [PDF] shows that drug prices have dropped more than 80 percent in the last two decades alone; purity and availability has risen; and overall addiction and death rates haven’t been cut, despite an exponential increase in incarceration since the 1980s.

With unemployment high, France forces stores to close early

By Peter Gumbel
September 25, 2013

The French like to refer to the Champs Elysées in Paris as “the most beautiful avenue in the world,” and 300,000 people stroll up and down it every day to see for themselves, many of them tourists looking to shop. No surprise, then, to find that retailers from Nike to LVMH are willing to pay premium rents for space on the avenue, which runs in a straight line from the Place de la Concorde up to the triumphal arch at Etoile.

Rebuilding America’s high-wage economy

By Robert Kuttner
August 1, 2013

Good for President Barack Obama for emphasizing the need to restore America’s middle class. However, the actual proposals in his new summer offensive would not go very far toward that worthy goal.

The regulatory cliff awaits

By Representative Sam Graves
December 6, 2012

As President Barack Obama’s first term ends and second begins, it is an opportune time to reflect on the cost and sheer volume of new red tape his administration has created; analyze its impact on small businesses, and prepare for what’s next.

Can the SEC ever improve?

September 7, 2012

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s case against Citigroup’s Brian Stoker, a director in the bank’s Global Markets group, seemed clear-cut. Stoker structured and marketed an investment portfolio consisting of credit default swaps. The agency accused him of misrepresenting deal terms and defrauding investors for not disclosing the bank’s bet against the portfolio while pitching the investment vehicle to customers. But when it came to trial earlier this summer, the government could not prove that Stoker knew or should have known that the pitches were misleading, and the jury didn’t convict.