The Great Debate

If Geithner didn’t bully S&P, he should have

By Michael Maiello
January 27, 2014

As part of its defense against a Department of Justice lawsuit alleging $5 billion in fraud, ratings agency Standard & Poor’s has argued that the United States has singled it out for persecution as payback for S&P’s 2011 downgrade of U.S. Treasury debt from “AAA” to “AA-plus.” Harold McGraw, chairman of McGraw Hill Financial, the owner of S&P, says that an angry Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner called to threaten him after the downgrade, warning ominously that he had earned the government’s ire and scrutiny. A spokesman for Geithner, who now works for a private equity firm, denies the claim.

Look at a house, get a free Mouse?

September 23, 2009

Scott Malone
- Scott Malone is a Reuters correspondent in Boston.-

Judging by the 52 percent run-up up in the Standard & Poor’s home builders index over the past three months, investors have been eager to get their money back into the long-slumping U.S. housing sector.

from The Great Debate UK:

The economy: reasons to be miserable

June 2, 2009

Laurence Copeland- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own. -

from The Great Debate UK:

A reality check from Standard & Poor’s

May 21, 2009

REUTERS-- Neil Collins is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

Standard & Poor's could have chosen a better day to kick the British economy, by placing the UK onto "negative outlook", the usual precursor to a downgrade of S&P's rating of an issuer's debt.