The Great Debate

from Breakingviews:

Solving the second-class stock dilemma

July 1, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Solving the second-class stock dilemma

July 1, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

To boost entrepreneurship, France tries to change its attitude toward failure

By Peter Gumbel
January 23, 2014

When entrepreneur-turned-venture capitalist Mark Bivens first moved to Paris in 2001, he regularly introduced himself as someone who had started three software companies in the U.S., two of which had flopped. That’s a badge of honor in Silicon Valley, where failure is viewed as a rite of passage. Not in France. One day, a French colleague took Bivens aside and gave him some friendly advice: if you want to reassure people, stop talking about the companies that didn’t work out. “I soon realized that failure carries a stigma,” Bivens says.

Five steps the SEC can take to make crowdfunding work

By Sara Hanks
May 29, 2012

A few weeks ago, President Obama signed the JOBS Act into law, making equity-based crowdfunding legal for businesses that want to raise capital in smaller amounts than traditional venture capitalists or accredited investors supply. Depending on who you ask, crowdfunding is either going to democratize access to capital and serve as a boon to small businesses across America, or it will be rife with con artists intent on bilking seniors out of their hard-earned savings.

from MediaFile:

Instagram’s Facebook filter

May 11, 2012

The startup had millions of users, but, from the beginning, just one customer.

The predominant way of interpreting Facebook’s billion-dollar purchase of Instagram, in light of the social-networking giant's forthcoming IPO, is that Mark Zuckerberg had to pick up the photo-sharing app to boost his company’s mobile engagement. That would allow him to guard the mobile flank against incursions from Google, Twitter, and whatever other social-media tools might next arise.