Twitter’s November initial public offering has been a success for the company’s founders and early investors. This reflects the market’s optimistic view of the company’s profit-making potential. For Twitter has transformed much of daily life — including how we get our news, communicate with others and participate in public discourse. (In fact, many media outlets now factor in what is trending on Twitter when covering news stories.)

Many politicians are now using Twitter to raise their profile. Most notable is the newest senator, Cory Booker (D-N.J.). Despite the fact that he was mayor of Newark, a city known for its high unemployment and high school dropout rates rather than good governance and policy innovation, Booker’s effective use of Twitter (1,446,106 followers) played a key role in making him a national political figure.

Twitter has significantly changed the way politicians get their message out and gauge public opinion. There are staffers at the Democratic National Committee and Republican National Committee whose job it is to count tweets. (No, really.) In addition to national politics, however, Twitter has transformed the way business is done in state capitals across the country.

While most state lawmakers and government officials weren’t early adopters of Twitter, many have now embraced the technology. Not only has Twitter changed the way legislators interact with constituents, it has helped make the governing process more transparent and increased the responsiveness and accountability of government officials.

Van Taylor, a member of the Texas House of Representatives, looks to Twitter to get feedback and public input on a bill in real time, as the legislature is debating and preparing to vote.