The Great Debate

Can Congress pull back from the brink?

By Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
December 13, 2012

Americans want to see Congress and the president make a deal on the “fiscal cliff,” that noxious mix of expiring tax cuts and mandatory spending slashing due at year’s end. They just don’t think it will happen without a lot of pain, according to recent polls.

Tim Geithner’s principal hypocrisy

By Neil Barofsky
August 6, 2012

Last week the acting director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Ed DeMarco, made a familiar argument. He announced that he would not approve the Obama administration’s request that struggling borrowers whose mortgages are backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac receive debt relief through principal reductions subsidized by the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). DeMarco’s refusal was based on his concern that granting such relief would encourage other borrowers to “strategically default” by not making payments on their loan to take advantage of the promise of a reduction in their debt. This is a version of the moral hazard argument we heard about so often in the early days of the financial crisis. Secretary Geithner, in response, argued in a public letter that notwithstanding such concerns, and for the greater good of the overall economy, such relief should be granted whenever it would result in a better economic outcome than foreclosure.

Fed’s wondrous printing press profits

January 14, 2010

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– James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are is own. –

Easier jawboning banks than leery borrowers

December 15, 2009

(James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

Jawbone all you like, but we are in a private sector de-leveraging, and bank lending and demand will remain weak, making interest rates unlikely to rise any time soon.

from Rolfe Winkler:

Bailout “profit” is taxpayers’ loss

September 1, 2009

Charging a bank for an implicit government guarantee to absorb losses? According to the Wall Street Journal, the Federal Reserve and Treasury are demanding that Bank of America pay $500 million to exit a bailout deal that was never actually signed.

Fishy bailout profits and ephemeral gains

By J Saft
September 1, 2009

jamessaft1.jpg(James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

There is a long list of outfits which have done well out of the banking bailout, but the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve are not among them.

from Commentaries:

Regulators are opaque, too

June 9, 2009

Matthew GoldsteinSo much for more transparency in the financial system.

It's hard for regulators to demand greater transparency from Wall Street banks when they can't even live up to their own standard of greater disclosure. A case in point is the Treasury Department's press release touting its decision to permit "10 of the largest U.S. financial institutions" to begin repaying $68 billion in federal bailout money. The only trouble is Treasury doesn't name any of the banks that can begin repaying money to the Troubled Asset Relief Program.

U.S. should batten down the TARP

By J Saft
May 15, 2009

James Saft Great Debate – James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

Goldman’s TARP out: give up ALL state aid

April 22, 2009

goldman-crop – Jonathan Ford is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own –

Tarp Two: New deal or no deal?

February 10, 2009

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks during a news conference in the Cash Room of the Treasury Department in Washington, February 10, 2009.

The U.S. Treasury Department on Tuesday unveiled a revamped financial rescue plan to cleanse up to $500 billion in spoiled assets from banks’ books and support $1 trillion in new lending through an expanded Federal Reserve program. But initial market reaction reflected investors’ doubts about the plan, with stocks falling around 3 percent after the announcement by Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.