Opinion

The Great Debate

iPhone 6, Apple Watch and Tim Cook all impress, but questions remain

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Tim Cook has had his first Steve Jobs moment.

With Tuesday’s introduction of the new iPhone 6 line, Apple Pay and Apple Watch, the company’s CEO escaped the public shadow of his revered predecessor. Now the question is: Can he deliver in the same impressive fashion?

The early signs indicate he just might. While Apple’s presentations are usually packed with an amen chorus of fans and tech journalists, the details the company revealed about its next line of phones, its new payment processing system and upcoming smart watch gave a clear sign that Apple is not becoming stagnant, as so many critics had feared.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are almost certain to be hot sellers when they become available on Sept. 19. The 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch models level the playing field between Apple and its larger-screened Android competitors. The processor and camera improvements are impressive. And the user interface changes the company showed off were promising.

Like the iPhone 5c and 5s, though, there’s no question about which model Apple is favoring. The advantages of the iPhone 6 Plus over the iPhone 6 go well beyond the screen size. The 6 Plus’s optical image stabilization (versus less effective digital stabilization) and a significantly better battery life will be strong drivers to the more expensive model, something that should make investors happy.

While the iPhone will be the company’s cash machine, the most interesting — and impressive — part of the event wasn’t the phone — or even the Apple Watch. It was Apple Pay, the company’s vision of changing how people interact with both brick and mortar and online retailers.

from MediaFile:

A new iPad, the same iEthics

Several days after the launch of the new iPad 3, HD, or whatever it’s called, we all know about it’s blazing 4G capabilities, including its ability to be a hotspot, carrier permitting, of course. We know about its Retina display, which makes the painful, insufferable scourge of image pixelization a thing of the past. We know about Infinity Blade. We know that to pack all this in, Apple’s designers had to let out the new iPad’s aluminum waist to accommodate some unfortunate but really quite microscopic weight gain. We know the iPad’s battery life is still amazing, and its price point is altogether unchanged. We know Apple has adopted a cunning new strategy of putting the previous-generation iPad, as it did with the iPhone 4, on a sort of permanent sale, to scoop up the low end of the high-end market. (We wonder if this was Steve Jobs’s last decree or Tim Cook’s first.) We know a lot about the iPad.

But what we don’t know: How many of Foxconn’s nearly 100,000 employees will harm themselves, intentionally or inadvertently -- or their families or loved ones -- in the manufacture of it? And will the developed world ever acknowledge the dark side of these truly transformative technologies, like the iPad, or will we continue to tell ourselves fables to explain away the havoc our addictions wreak on the developing world? Is a device really magic if to pull a rabbit out of a hat, you have to kill a disappearing dove?

Those of us who have been technology journalists have long been subjected to the cult of Steve Jobs’s Apple, and those of us who are fans of technology are mostly well aware of the stark elegance and extreme usability -- even the words seem inadequate -- that come with using, let alone experiencing, Apple products. But the rumblings about Apple’s manufacturing processes started years ago, and the recent New York Times series on the ignobility of Foxconn as an employer blew a hole in the side of that particular ship of willful ignorance. Few Apple consumers can claim not to understand the human sacrifice behind their glowing screens -- the death, diseases, exhaustion, mental and emotional stress, and superhuman expectations placed upon the workers who bring these magic devices to life. It’s not just in the papers -- Mike Daisey’s This American Life podcast exposé on Foxconn and Apple is a mere click away, and most mainstream media have given at least passing coverage to the working conditions reflected in the Gorilla Glass on our devices.

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